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Spaghetti Western


#61

[quote=“Contrai”]
I’m sick of this.

Always saying stuff like “w/o Tarantino Leone would still be obscure”, and comparing him with Hitchcock or Scorsese makes me wanna puke.

Perhaps that is really true in the eyes of a younger generation - I’m 28 and i sure don’t think so -, but it’s still a shame.

[/quote]
I wouldnt say Tarantino is better than Hitchcock but he does get people to watch alot of films that they really wouldnt regularly watch


#62

Yes. But what did the people, before QT came and gave his hints ?

We knew Leone before 1992.

Now everybody is saying, we just watch the movies because QT made references.


#63

[quote=“Contrai”]
Yes. But what did the people, before QT came and gave his hints ?

We knew Leone before 1992.

Now everybody is saying, we just watch the movies because QT made references.
[/quote]

I agree with that, just because Leone was such an influential director that to only watch his films because QT likes them is ridiculous.


#64

I think Kill Bill proved to be more of a promotion of Asian cinema than Leone films. I mean apart from Morricone music (which most of which was used in Kill Bill did not even make part of Leone’s films), there aren’t exactly many clear references as to make you shout “omg that’s definetely taken from Leone!” when you watch the film. Kill Bill is a 90% homage to Asian Cinema, 10% homage to spaghetti western.



And Leone already had a massive following before Kill Bill came out, no doubt about that.


#65

anybody seen django?


#66

Quentin Tarantino has.


#67

[quote=“Hans”]
Quentin Tarantino has.
[/quote]

lol



http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Django


#68

i always thought it was a tad bit overrated, cause i’ve seen it compared to Fistful, which is not right, 125 shots of Nero’s face being reveiled by looking up does not match up with the beauty that is Fistful, the start and finish are excellent but in between i’m missing some stuff


#69

I watched it before getting interested in italo western at all. There i thought it’s quite okay, but not as good as Fistful . It had a strange feeling: the KKK stuff,the ugly hookers,the slobberish location;it definitively was something different than i expected. But even there it was way better that the wannabe “Django” stuff i watched the yrs later, by directors like Demofilo Fidani, Giuliano Carnimeo or Ferdinando Baldi.


#70

i like the KKK stuff in it, gives it a great touch, strange, meaning diffrent

Ferdinando Baldi made Viva Django which is really great

I like “Django, Kill” (sei vivo spara) more than Django, pistolwhip me if you want but i really love Django Kill, all it lacks is a great score


#71

Viva Django is great, right.

I had to watch it in a german comedy synchro which ruins the whole dialogues, but visually its top - notch.

Have never seen such a warped graveyard, its almost expressionistic :slight_smile:


#72

yeah its a great film. on the new EMS dvd just select the english track, its not so clumsy as the german one:



<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index. … la_bara%21”>http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Preparati_la_bara!</LINK_TEXT>


#73

[quote=“Johny|Exhale”]
I like “Django, Kill” (sei vivo spara) more than Django, pistolwhip me if you want but i really love Django Kill, all it lacks is a great score
[/quote]

<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index. … vivo_spara”>http://www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Se_sei_vivo_spara</LINK_TEXT>



yeah, great sinister flick, but the script is a bit inconsistent. the movie doesnt really know where it wants to go


#74

yeah it’s a sleazy horror-like western but with a very surreal arthouse look to it, so that the silly scenes, like the torture scene with the bats, are still enjoyable cause they’re so visually chilling, no leone ripoffs, not even a django ripoff (regardless of the title), it’s in its own little genre, very rare for its time, and very ahead of it in terms of editing and stuff


#75

There’s 2 Viva Django’s out there. But I’m assuming the Terence Hill version is the more recoginzed. Haven’t seen that one, but I’ve seen the other with Anthony Steffen also known as V Django. Hardly a dull moment in it, but still nothing really special.



Django Kill is crazy indeed, but as Seb pointed out, an unclear narrative hurts it. Not an overall great score as well, but I do like the theme song.

Here’s a clip of Alex Cox introducing it.


#76

thx for the clip! i’ve seen a couple of introductions by him, are they on certain dvd’s or just for tv?


#77

i have a question: what movie is considered the absolute first spaghetti western?


#78

[quote=“Johny|Exhale”]
thx for the clip! i’ve seen a couple of introductions by him, are they on certain dvd’s or just for tv?
[/quote]


You can see all of them on youtube

#79

[quote=“Johny|Exhale”]
thx for the clip! i’ve seen a couple of introductions by him, are they on certain dvd’s or just for tv?
[/quote]

These were for TV but he’s done one (To my knowledge) on DVD. There’s a few more of those intros for Trinity,Django,My name is nobody,etc, on Youtube.

[quote=“Bad Max”]
i have a question: what movie is considered the absolute first spaghetti western?
[/quote]

Well, Eurowesterns go all the way back to the silent era, but the big predecessor to the break-out Fistful of Dollars was 1963’s Gunfight at Red Sands. (www.spaghetti-western.net/index.php/Duello_nel_Texas)


#80

Speaking personally in regards to Leone being introduced by QT. I grew up going to the movies and watching alot of movies on TV and VHS in the 80s. I saw The GBU and Once Upon In The West and Once Upon A Time in America (in the theater in 1984) long before I even knew who QT was. Those films were really mainstream to me, they werent any different than seeing other American Westerns on TV. As a kid, I always knew Leone as the guy who made those crazy Westerns with Clint Eastwood. The same with The Trinity movies. They were pretty standard Saturday afternoon-night movie watching for me back then.



To me, when QT came along he was like a new friend who happened to know way more about movies than me, saying “If you liked that, check THIS one out”. Hes still really very much like a video store clerk even today. He’s just able to make films himself now and he has a bigger impact on people. Its one of his best traits as an celebrity too.