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Halloween II (2009)

"51% Motherfucker … 49% Son Of A Bitch"





What the fuck? xD

[quote=“RatQuiRit”]"51% Motherfucker … 49% Son Of A Bitch"





What the fuck? xD[/quote]


I don't know. It is some artwork a friend of his came up with. Zombie has shown alot of these artworks online. He was going to do this movie before H2, but they wanted a sequel, in which he didn't want to do, so this is next. The way people talked about it, it is like Devil's Rejects meets a B-movie, acton film I guess that takes place in the 60s-70s.

I can guarantee you that the blonde is Sheri Moon.



I wonder what T-Rex is about? -Besides being a mother fucking son of a bitch. :wink:

[quote=“ThaDuke”]I can guarantee you that the blonde is Sheri Moon.



I wonder what T-Rex is about? -Besides being a mother fucking son of a bitch. :wink:[/quote]


I forgot, it's like a washed up boxer or something. Let me try to find out real quick.

[quote=“G”]I forgot, it’s like a washed up boxer or something. Let me try to find ot real quick.[/quote]

So it’s like, “Raging Bull”, but the guy goes postal?

[quote=“ThaDuke”][quote=“G”]I forgot, it’s like a washed up boxer or something. Let me try to find ot real quick.[/quote]

So it’s like, “Raging Bull”, but the guy goes postal?[/quote]

Pretty much. I think it was a boxer turned biker thing. All I found was the T-Rex title was a reference to someone’s name - who could also be a bad-ass biker, wrestler, criminal…



But I thought I remembered hearing something about a washed up boxer. Either way, it’s going to be a “trashy”, 70’s, Sheri Moon Zombie (who I kind of like, though isn’t the best of actresses), movie that sounds like Devil’s Rejects in terms of it’s look and feel.

I have high expectations for Halloween II and im sure it wont dissapoint.

[quote=“Scarface”]American horror is dead. Europe is where it’s at nowadays.[/quote]
Although everyone else is definitely on this bandwagon, I’m kind of on a crossroads with Euro-horror right now. It seems like for every Inside or Let the Right One In, there’s a Frontier(s) or something. I’m just finding a lot of the stuff to be derivative of Hollywood pap, but slightly more brutal. I’m like one of the few guys out there that didn’t give Marty’s a glowing writeup though.



There is some great stuff coming out of Europe though. Let the Right One In, Inside, [Rec], The Orphanage and even stuff like Dead Snow and Martyrs are certainly worth watching. Even though I’m in the minority of finding them rather “meh”, they’re having a tremendous impact in the horror community.

Horror is dead IMO. No Fulci, no Romero (prime), no Bava, no Carpenter, no Argento (prime), etc.



Today no new ideas, all remakes, revisions, same ol’ zombies, vamps, etc.

I never Thought of Let The Right One In as a horror movie. It has vampires and some really scary and tense moments but that’s more of a romance, isn’t it? If it’s a horror film, it’s, to say the least, a very unconventional one.

Eli Roth and Rob Zombie are the only good modern day horror directors.

[quote=“RatQuiRit”]I never Thought of Let The Right One In as a horror movie. It has vampires and some really scary and tense moments but that’s more of a romance, isn’t it? If it’s a horror film, it’s, to say the least, a very unconventional one.[/quote]

I agree. I liked it but prob won’t see it again. It was a little over-hyped here in the states due to the stupid Twilight movie, some smart people wanted a real vampire film.

[quote=“G”]Horror is dead IMO. No Fulci, no Romero (prime), no Bava, no Carpenter, no Argento (prime), etc.



Today no new ideas, all remakes, revisions, same ol’ zombies, vamps, etc.[/quote]
Nah, there’s still plenty of interesting stuff flying around if you look hard enough. From the straight to video Indie releases to the foreign market, there’s always something new coming out these days and usually with some flair, style and occasionally a new idea or two.



Right now, I’m currently digging on the more extreme side of things. Japan is kicking out some pretty outrageous gore flicks nowadays, centered on an American marketplace the films are just getting crazier and crazier. They’re far from anything one would consider “good” or an artistic endeavor, but they’re jam packed full of some of the most “out there” thinking you’ll see from a gore flick. Essentially, it’s as if some horror geeks got around a table and said “what’s the most messed up stuff we could do with latex?” then went out and did it - while throwing in some ninjas, yakuzas, guns, swords, etc. Guys like Noboru Iguchi and Yoshihiro Nishimura are really pioneering the stuff.



The Europeans are probably the ones to be looking at for developing star directors, as their films are a bit more mainstream - despite being incredibly violent as well. Still, the films are well paced, well shot and if you find the right ones are engaging with original ideas.



In America, as much as we all like to shit on them, we do have guys like Roth and Zombie who are holding down the fort. Although I think both filmmakers would do better to stop paying homage to the past and start developing new styles and original concepts - I do appreciate them keeping horror in the forefront and at least keeping those doors open. We’ve got guys like Coscarelli still pumping away making quality projects, we’ve had Frank Henenlotter come back from the film-graveyard and bash everyone over the head with a flashlight when delivering the absolutely bonkers/brilliant Bad Biology. Then there are some fresh faces out there, like Jon Knautz who hit one out of the ball park with Jack Brooks: Monster Slayer and I really liked Gregg Bishop’s Dance of the Dead from last year.



Horror is always there I think, it’s just a lot of the crap gets heaved on top of some of the really interesting stuff out there.

I was prob making a crappy statement there, because I like directors like Zombie (loved his ex-band White Zombie) and the fact that he loves past horror films and knows about them, like a little version of Tarantino, but just to horror films.

You don’t like horror movies, pantsman, do you? :smiley:

[quote=“RatQuiRit”]You don’t like horror movies, pantsman, do you? :smiley:[/quote]
HATE them! Too violent for me ;D

[quote=“pantsman”][quote=“RatQuiRit”]You don’t like horror movies, pantsman, do you? :smiley:[/quote]
HATE them! Too violent for me ;D[/quote]


Kind of like Mr. Pink being on a Tarantino fan board. ;D Just kidding.

[quote=“G”][quote=“pantsman”][quote=“RatQuiRit”]You don’t like horror movies, pantsman, do you? :smiley:[/quote]
HATE them! Too violent for me ;D[/quote]


Kind of like Mr. Pink being on a Tarantino fan board. ;D Just kidding.[/quote]

Im a huge Tarantino fan but I only like his 90s films.

[quote=“Mr.Pink”]
Im a huge Tarantino fan but I only like his 90s films.[/quote]


Like I said, just kidding with you. His 90's films is why you should be a Tarantino fan.

[quote=“G”]I was prob making a crappy statement there, because I like directors like Zombie (loved his ex-band White Zombie) and the fact that he loves past horror films and knows about them, like a little version of Tarantino, but just to horror films.[/quote]
Yeah, but it’s understandable. I used to feel the same way, but as of recent I’ve come to appreciate just where horror cinema stands and what can be accomplished.



And I would definitely say that Let the Right One In is a horror. Despite the romantic influence, just on pure content I’d say it has to be qualified as a horror. I think sometimes there’s a gut instinct to label a film as something other than “horror” when it breaks through those genre barriers and takes on a more classically artistic approach or blends genres. Almost as if it’s “too good” for the genre, but I would say with the few scares it has and the fact that it deals with and plays with classic horror-genre pastiche - it just has to be qualified that way.