The Quentin Tarantino Archives logo

Writing Style and Pace - What attracted me to QT's Movies


#1

How many of you have seen the original BW version of “IT”? Titled “It came from Outer Space”. All time classic horror movie. James Arness as the monster, giant green carrot guy, trapped at the north pole. OK. What I love about this movie is the pace of the dialogue. It grabs you and pulls you through the entire movie. There are no great special effects, sets or big name actors. The suspense is there, but it’s built through ‘dialogue’, well paced and very well written. Great character actors too.



The point I’m making is, when I saw Res Dogs and Pulp Fiction. I saw, It Came From Outer Space. There it was, ‘pound, pound, pound’. Perfect timing delivered dialogue. On the money. Pulling you through the movie with characters you could give a shit about. I hadn’t seen this done in years. And this is what drew me to Quentin and his movies.



With Kill Bill 1, although he didn’t have as much of that type of dialogue. He excelled in different areas. KB was a hommage to a type of movie, and revenge was the driving force. It pulled you along from scene to scene. In KB 2, it wasn’t so much the softer side of Sears. But a mature look at the process of revenge. The cullmanation [sp] or its act, process and remanants. Which is why its my favorite of the two.



With IB, I’m hoping for the QT dialogue pull. It’s a high for me. Keeps me on the edge of my seat, eyes widened and salivating for more. Needless to say, he’s my favorite screenwriter.


#2

oh yea no doubt about it, there only two other directors that have that dialogue, well three i guess: Kevin Smith, and The Coen Brothers


#3

[quote=“roulette67”]
How many of you have seen the original BW version of “IT”? Titled “It came from Outer Space”. All time classic horror movie. James Arness as the monster, giant green carrot guy, trapped at the north pole. OK. What I love about this movie is the pace of the dialogue. It grabs you and pulls you through the entire movie. There are no great special effects, sets or big name actors. The suspense is there, but it’s built through ‘dialogue’, well paced and very well written. Great character actors too.



The point I’m making is, when I saw Res Dogs and Pulp Fiction. I saw, It Came From Outer Space. There it was, ‘pound, pound, pound’. Perfect timing delivered dialogue. On the money. Pulling you through the movie with characters you could give a shit about. I hadn’t seen this done in years. And this is what drew me to Quentin and his movies.[/quote]

Tarantino has admitted being a HUGE Howard Hawks fan (especially of the Comedy film, BRINGING UP BABY for the quick & witty banter between characters, especially male & female characters) in that Charlie Rose Interview, seen on the PULP FICTION Special Edition DVD.



But the film you described above is Hawks’ THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD, based on the same short story, “Who Goes There”, that John Carpenter’s THE THING was also based from?



There are two old sci-fi flicks called IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE and IT! THE TERROR BEYOND SPACE. Click on the titles for Amazon.com’s info. on them.



What attracted me to Quentin’s movies was a combination of things: his quirky narrative structure (which has been done before, but he kinda brought it back), his dialogue & pop culture references, cool characters (and their interesting names) and most importantly his sheers audacity to combine humor with occassionally shocking (out of the blue) violence w/o any apologies.



8)


#4

[quote]
Tarantino has admitted being a HUGE Howard Hawks fan (especially of the Comedy film, BRINGING UP BABY for the quick & witty banter between characters, especially male & female characters) in that Charlie Rose Interview, seen on the PULP FICTION Special Edition DVD.



But the film you described above is Hawks’ THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD, based on the same short story, “Who Goes There”, that John Carpenter’s THE THING was also based from?



There are two old sci-fi flicks called IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE and IT! THE TERROR BEYOND SPACE. Click on the titles for Amazon.com’s info. on them.



What attracted me to Quentin’s movies was a combination of things: his quirky narrative structure (which has been done before, but he kinda brought it back), his dialogue & pop culture references, cool characters (and their interesting names) and most importantly his sheers audacity to combine humor with occassionally shocking (out of the blue) violence w/o any apologies.



8)
[/quote]


Thanks for correcting me. Wasn't sure I had the title right, but hey we try. How could I forget 'violence w/o apologies'. It wouldn't be Quentin without it.