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The name doesn't make much sense?


#1

Ok…I know at the beginning of the movie, there’s a dictionary defenition of the word “pulp”, but what relevance does that have with the movie? I never understood what the title meant exactly.


#2

The movie (so the 3 stories) is an hommage to all the “pulps” that QT read. It isn’t so difficult. What don’t you understand ? ???


#3

yeah, the term "pulp fiction’ is the term used to refer to all of those corny cliche storys…QT in his move "pulp Fiction’ then uses three of the most stereotypical storylines of these pulp fictions- gangsters on a job that goes wrong; the gangster and the mobsters wife; and the boxer who throws the fixed fight (that might not be exactley right, but thats the gist of it as I remeber it from QT’s explanation on an interview for PF).


#4

Interesting…I don’t know why other people on the site I talk to think I’m dumb for not realizing what the title meant…You have to think outside of the box to figure it out.


#5

[quote=“Jot”]
yeah, the term "pulp fiction’ is the term used to refer to all of those corny cliche storys…QT in his move "pulp Fiction’ then uses three of the most stereotypical storylines of these pulp fictions- gangsters on a job that goes wrong; the gangster and the mobsters wife; and the boxer who throws the fixed fight (that might not be exactley right, but thats the gist of it as I remeber it from QT’s explanation on an interview for PF).
[/quote]name me one pulp that has that kind of plot…most literature reffered to as pulp is usally comic literature or western stories.


#6

Pulp Magazine





Pulp magazines, often simply called “the pulps”, were inexpensive text fiction magazines widely published in the 1920s through the 1950s. The first “pulp” is considered to be Frank Munsey’s revamped Argosy Magazine of 1896. Most of the pulp magazines still around today are science fiction or mystery magazines, now in the form of digest magazines.



The name comes from the cheap wood pulp paper on which they were printed. Magazines printed on better paper and usually offering family-oriented content were often called “slicks.” Pulps were the successor to the “penny dreadfuls” and “dime novels” of the nineteenth century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are perhaps best remembered for their fast-paced, lurid, sensationalistic, and exploitive stories. Parallels between comic books and pulp magazines can be drawn; for example, magazines often featured illustrated novel-length stories of heroic characters such as The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Phantom Detective. Pulp covers were famous for their half-dressed damsels in distress, usually awaiting a rescuing hero.



Pulp magazines often contained a wide variety of genres. Detective/mystery was the largest genre. Others included science fiction, romance, adventure, war, horror/occult, and more. Many of the pulp heroes actually fell into one or more of these genres.





Authors and pulp magazines today

Many well-known authors wrote for the pulps at one time or another. Note that many people would make a distinction between an author who wrote for the pulps but later went on to transcend the limitations of the genre, and a “pulp author”, who did not.



Well-known authors who wrote for the pulps include:



Poul Anderson

Isaac Asimov

Alfred Bester

Robert Bloch

Leigh Brackett

Ray Bradbury

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Ellis Parker Butler

Hugh B. Cave

Raymond Chandler

Arthur C. Clarke

Philip K. Dick

Erle Stanley Gardner

Dashiell Hammett

Robert Heinlein

Frank Herbert

Robert E. Howard

L. Ron Hubbard

Elmore John Leonard

H. P. Lovecraft

John D. MacDonald

Johnston McCulley

Seabury Quinn

Richard S. Shaver

Robert Silverberg

Clark Ashton Smith

Jack Vance



Many classic science fiction and crime novels were originally serialized in pulp magazines such as Weird Tales, Amazing Stories, and Black Mask. The format eventually declined (especially in the 1950s) with rising paper costs, competition from comic books, television, and the paperback novel, although it is still in use for some lengthy serials, like the German SF weekly Perry Rhodan (over 2200 issues as of 2003).


#7

Pulp Magazine



Pulp magazines, often simply called “the pulps”, were inexpensive text fiction magazines widely published in the 1920s through the 1950s. The first “pulp” is considered to be Frank Munsey’s revamped Argosy Magazine of 1896. Most of the pulp magazines still around today are science fiction or mystery magazines, now in the form of digest magazines.



The name comes from the cheap wood pulp paper on which they were printed. Magazines printed on better paper and usually offering family-oriented content were often called “slicks.” Pulps were the successor to the “penny dreadfuls” and “dime novels” of the nineteenth century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are perhaps best remembered for their fast-paced, lurid, sensationalistic, and exploitive stories. Parallels between comic books and pulp magazines can be drawn; for example, magazines often featured illustrated novel-length stories of heroic characters such as The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Phantom Detective. Pulp covers were famous for their half-dressed damsels in distress, usually awaiting a rescuing hero.



Pulp magazines often contained a wide variety of genres. Detective/mystery was the largest genre. Others included science fiction, romance, adventure, war, horror/occult, and more. Many of the pulp heroes actually fell into one or more of these genres.





Authors and pulp magazines today

Many well-known authors wrote for the pulps at one time or another. Note that many people would make a distinction between an author who wrote for the pulps but later went on to transcend the limitations of the genre, and a “pulp author”, who did not.



Well-known authors who wrote for the pulps include:



Poul Anderson

Isaac Asimov

Alfred Bester

Robert Bloch

Leigh Brackett

Ray Bradbury

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Ellis Parker Butler

Hugh B. Cave

Raymond Chandler

Arthur C. Clarke

Philip K. Dick

Erle Stanley Gardner

Dashiell Hammett

Robert Heinlein

Frank Herbert

Robert E. Howard

L. Ron Hubbard

Elmore John Leonard

H. P. Lovecraft

John D. MacDonald

Johnston McCulley

Seabury Quinn

Richard S. Shaver

Robert Silverberg

Clark Ashton Smith

Jack Vance



Many classic science fiction and crime novels were originally serialized in pulp magazines such as Weird Tales, Amazing Stories, and Black Mask. The format eventually declined (especially in the 1950s) with rising paper costs, competition from comic books, television, and the paperback novel, although it is still in use for some lengthy serials, like the German SF weekly Perry Rhodan (over 2200 issues as of 2003).


#8

Crap I repeated.


#9

lol, everything you ever needed to know about Pulp fictions 8)


#10

WOW. period.















I think you did a little too much research…but still very informative. :wink:


#11

thats real interesting to know .


#12

hmm


#13

Dont know dont care.


#14

[quote=“me”]
Dont know dont care.
[/quote]^ why is david hasselhoff so popular? because he’s an alcoholic?


#15

[quote=“Black Mamba!”]
Ok…I know at the beginning of the movie, there’s a dictionary defenition of the word “pulp”, but what relevance does that have with the movie? I never understood what the title meant exactly.
[/quote]
look up the definition of Grindhouse.

Here: I’ve done it for you! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exploitation_film 



now read the section called Subgenres.


#16

It is time that I explain my name:



Kurt Vonnegut is a well-known science fiction/political satirist who has an alter-ego named Kilgore Trout. Kilgore Trout is a fictional character in many of his novels who is a Pulp writer. According to Vonnegut, Pulp writers could only get their work published in smut magazines and the like - which made them no money and gave them no acclaim whatsoever - which led to their “selling out” by writing more run-of-the-mill stories. Kurt Vonnegut has even accused himself of being guilty of this act. There you have it…Kilgore Trout has been revealed.



If any of you are interested, Slaughterhouse V is probably Kurt Vonnegut’s most popular novel and is the one that turned me on to his writing. I highly recommend it to anyone looking to expand himself intellectually.

Other really great novels by Vonnegut include:

The Sirens of Titan

Welcome to the Monkey House

Bluebeard

Timequake

Cat’s Cradle - a study of anthropology