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Partially audible conversations


#1

How do you introduce these in a script profesionally, for example, if there are two people talking, but the viewer can just hear phrases or certain words?



Could it be like:



CHARACTER: (This) line (is just) partially audible, (dude, you) can’t hear (it all),



where text in brackets is unheard or just muffled?



And a similar thing. Sometimes characters get interrupted, but you want to show all the intended speech, so that the actor knows what tone to use and all. How do you show that?


#2

[quote=“Bleach”]
How do you introduce these in a script profesionally, for example, if there are two people talking, but the viewer can just hear phrases or certain words?



Could it be like:



CHARACTER: (This) line (is just) partially audible, (dude, you) can’t hear (it all),



where text in brackets is unheard or just muffled?



And a similar thing. Sometimes characters get interrupted, but you want to show all the intended speech, so that the actor knows what tone to use and all. How do you show that?
[/quote]
wouldn’t the director advise the actors based on notes given by the writer of the script?


#3

Well, I am asking to know if there’s a system invented for that, if not, then you can stick the script full of notes, which makes it less appealing I think.


#4

I can’t see any other way of accomplishing this feat.


#5

Well, let’s wait for a pro then.


#6

Usually you only must write what will be heart completly.


  1. If a character is interrupted, you stop the text when the other is starting speaking.

Then if you wanna know for you and for the actor, what’s the intended speech, you have to take notes for you. Cause of course it seems more natural for the actor to say the whole text, and be really interrupted. Otherwise, he’ll stop suddently cause he doesn’t know what to say later.


  1. If one tells not very audible conversations, you can still write it, but you must write it so :

    CHARACTER 1

    (whispering, or not quite audible)

    Blabla, Blabla, Blabla



    Do you got any other situations ? Cause I can explain you other solutions.



    But one thing I can tell you, is that, you can break the rules, and have your own, to have your own coherence. You can find an original system. :wink:

#7

[quote]1. If a character is interrupted, you stop the text when the other is starting speaking.

Then if you wanna know for you and for the actor, what’s the intended speech, you have to take notes for you. Cause of course it seems more natural for the actor to say the whole text, and be really interrupted. Otherwise, he’ll stop suddently cause he doesn’t know what to say later.[/quote]

Interupted isn’t the same as inaudible.



It’s a toughie though. With interview transcripts they’d just put an (INAUDIBLE)

in place of the part that’s inaudible.



This is how I think it would go in a screenplay.

Let’s say the full sentence is this and the BOLD text is what you want to be inaudible:



"Me and Johny are going to the museum to see the dinosaur exhibit."



I think this is how you’d make parts of it inaudible.



"Me and (INAUDIBLE) are going to the (INAUDIBLE) to see the (INAUDIBLE).



That’s just me guessing though. The best bet would be to find a movie that has a similar scene,

then find that script and see how hat writer did it.


#8

[quote=“DexPac”]
Interupted isn’t the same as inaudible.



It’s a toughie though. With interview transcripts they’d just put an (INAUDIBLE)

in place of the part that’s inaudible.



This is how I think it would go in a screenplay.

Let’s say the full sentence is this and the BOLD text is what you want to be inaudible:



"Me and Johny are going to the museum to see the dinosaur exhibit."



I think this is how you’d make parts of it inaudible.



"Me and (INAUDIBLE) are going to the (INAUDIBLE) to see the (INAUDIBLE).



That’s just me guessing though. The best bet would be to find a movie that has a similar scene,

then find that script and see how hat writer did it.

[/quote]

Hit the nail on the head. Exactly right, couldn’t of said it better myself.