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Walk in others' shoes... Scared?


#1

Reciprocal

By Michael Smith



“When it comes to breaking the uncivilized nigger, use the same process as breaking a horse, but vary the degree and step up the pressure so as to do a complete reversal of the mind. Take the meanest and most restless nigger on the plantation. While fighting in defiance in the presence of a female slave, a nigger infant and six or more male nigger slaves; tar and feather him. Next, tie each leg and each arm to a different horse faced in opposite directions set him a fire and beat the horses to pull him apart in front of the attending captives. The next step is to take a bullwhip and beat the remaining male niggers to the point of death in front of the female and the infant. Don’t kill them but put the fear of God in them, for they can be useful for future breeding…â€?

–W. Lynch



United States of America – Present Day



At first glance, the average person would probably not consider Jamil a unique guy. He lives a pretty modest lifestyle and abides by the traditions and cultural norms set forth by those whom came before him. He is honorable yet sly, loyal yet selfish, educated yet unruly and, like most Americans, has been somewhat desensitized to the inordinate number of fallacies which configure these United States.



Those who know him best would be accurate in judging him an emotionally confused, walking oxymoron. Biracial, sent to a foster home at birth, then adopted as a teenager; Jamil’s character is riddled with polarity. Exemplified by the fact that one of his two very good friends is a college professor with a double Ph.D., that lectures on preservation of their race. The other is a money savvy, streetwise, former gang member, turned hustler, who sells illegal narcotics to the population the professor is trying to save. Both exist in a country where Black is to White as water is to oil.



Breaking from the stereotypical, Jamil has a wonderful girlfriend who’d like nothing more than to be his wife. He can’t yet fathom the notion of marriage because his loyalty barometer was corrupted by his last set of foster parents who chose to rape and beat the innocence, trust, and commitment out of him.



His adoptive parents, both White, have tried to instill in both he and his brother the appropriate way to live; while his biological mother, Black and father, White, married when Jamil was six, but saw no value in bringing her deliberate and his unjustified “accident� back to the home front. Both now desire his commitment on another level, as his biological mother needs a life saving lung transplant and has requested his support as a potential donor. The question is, “what decision will Jamil make and would a different decision have prevented the eventual life altering incident that created the climate for the murders he ultimately commits?�



So what does all this have to do with the initial quote, referenced above but first stated by the White-raced, African slaveholder Mr. W. Lynch in 1712? In Reciprocal, Mr. Lynch was the Black-raced, European slaveholder who, in 1712, was credited with planting the seed that created the, present day, slave mind. Jamil Rhoholo Idowi is a White man living within that conditioning in Black dominated America. Although he may be physiologically biracial, as in all cases in American history, he is ethnically identified the same way all other visibly biracial people are: as members of the minority race. Jamil is one of the biologically mixed-race, but culturally identified, European-American descendants of former European slaves who occupy present day; African dominated America, just as they have for over 400 years.



Reciprocal is the story of a truly deprived White Man. Like most minorities, he has a background diverse in semantic interaction, heavy in rhetoric; yet light in productive transaction. Typical experiences with friends and family are contrasted by very atypical experiences with violence and death, which spin his life, uncontrollably, into eventual catastrophe. His life epitomizes the complexities of modern day race relations, alluding to both, blatant racism, as well as, engrained racial privilege. His existence tackles the ultimate quandary in what has proven to be the most controversial, fascinating, detrimental, and expensive predicament in American history. Black dominated racism against the inadequate White race. RECIPROCAL



Reciprocal proves that walking in others’ shoes is harder then you thought!


#2

[quote=“reciprocal_1974”]
Reciprocal

By Michael Smith



“When it comes to breaking the uncivilized nigger, use the same process as breaking a horse, but vary the degree and step up the pressure so as to do a complete reversal of the mind. Take the meanest and most restless nigger on the plantation. While fighting in defiance in the presence of a female slave, a nigger infant and six or more male nigger slaves; tar and feather him. Next, tie each leg and each arm to a different horse faced in opposite directions set him a fire and beat the horses to pull him apart in front of the attending captives. The next step is to take a bullwhip and beat the remaining male niggers to the point of death in front of the female and the infant. Don’t kill them but put the fear of God in them, for they can be useful for future breeding…â€?

–W. Lynch



United States of America – Present Day



At first glance, the average person would probably not consider Jamil a unique guy. He lives a pretty modest lifestyle and abides by the traditions and cultural norms set forth by those whom came before him. He is honorable yet sly, loyal yet selfish, educated yet unruly and, like most Americans, has been somewhat desensitized to the inordinate number of fallacies which configure these United States.



Those who know him best would be accurate in judging him an emotionally confused, walking oxymoron. Biracial, sent to a foster home at birth, then adopted as a teenager; Jamil’s character is riddled with polarity. Exemplified by the fact that one of his two very good friends is a college professor with a double Ph.D., that lectures on preservation of their race. The other is a money savvy, streetwise, former gang member, turned hustler, who sells illegal narcotics to the population the professor is trying to save. Both exist in a country where Black is to White as water is to oil.



Breaking from the stereotypical, Jamil has a wonderful girlfriend who’d like nothing more than to be his wife. He can’t yet fathom the notion of marriage because his loyalty barometer was corrupted by his last set of foster parents who chose to rape and beat the innocence, trust, and commitment out of him.



His adoptive parents, both White, have tried to instill in both he and his brother the appropriate way to live; while his biological mother, Black and father, White, married when Jamil was six, but saw no value in bringing her deliberate and his unjustified “accident� back to the home front. Both now desire his commitment on another level, as his biological mother needs a life saving lung transplant and has requested his support as a potential donor. The question is, “what decision will Jamil make and would a different decision have prevented the eventual life altering incident that created the climate for the murders he ultimately commits?�



So what does all this have to do with the initial quote, referenced above but first stated by the White-raced, African slaveholder Mr. W. Lynch in 1712? In Reciprocal, Mr. Lynch was the Black-raced, European slaveholder who, in 1712, was credited with planting the seed that created the, present day, slave mind. Jamil Rhoholo Idowi is a White man living within that conditioning in Black dominated America. Although he may be physiologically biracial, as in all cases in American history, he is ethnically identified the same way all other visibly biracial people are: as members of the minority race. Jamil is one of the biologically mixed-race, but culturally identified, European-American descendants of former European slaves who occupy present day; African dominated America, just as they have for over 400 years.



Reciprocal is the story of a truly deprived White Man. Like most minorities, he has a background diverse in semantic interaction, heavy in rhetoric; yet light in productive transaction. Typical experiences with friends and family are contrasted by very atypical experiences with violence and death, which spin his life, uncontrollably, into eventual catastrophe. His life epitomizes the complexities of modern day race relations, alluding to both, blatant racism, as well as, engrained racial privilege. His existence tackles the ultimate quandary in what has proven to be the most controversial, fascinating, detrimental, and expensive predicament in American history. Black dominated racism against the inadequate White race. RECIPROCAL



Reciprocal proves that walking in others’ shoes is harder then you thought!

[/quote]
There is something to it, only this is a bit too much for me so late tonight.

I’ll try and read it tomorrow, at least 10 times :wink: