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Tarantino's Trademark Style


#1

What are some of Tarantino’s Trademark stlyes in his films. I think that anything very violent and grusome where the character has to suffer alot before he/she dies is very Quentin.


#2

From IMDB:



Trade mark

His main characters drive cars from Chevrolet, such as Jules’ 1974 Nova and Vincent’s 1960s Malibu. He often frames characters with doorways and shows them opening and closing doors. Much of the violence and minor character dialogue is offscreen in his films.



Briefcases and suitcases play an important role in Pulp Fiction (1994), Reservoir Dogs (1992), Jackie Brown (1997), True Romance (1993), and Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004).



Makes references to cult movies and television.



Frequently works with Harvey Keitel.



His films usually have a shot from inside a car trunk.



Frequently casts Tim Roth



Lead characters usually drive General Motors vehicles, particularly Chevrolet and Cadillac.



It always has a Dutch element in his films: The opening tune, Little Green Bag, in Reservoir Dogs was performed by George Baker and written by Jan Gerbrand Visser and Benjamino Bouwens who are all Dutch. The character Freddy Newandyke, played by Tim Roth is a direct translation to a typical Dutch last name, Nieuwendijk. The code name of Tim Roth is Mr. Orange, the royal color of Holland, and the last name of the royal family. The Amsterdam conversation in PulpFiction, Vincent Vega smokes from a Dutch tobacco shag (Samson), the mentioning of Rutger Hauer in Jackie Brown, the bride’s name is Beatrix, the name of the Royal Dutch Queen.



The Mexican Standoff: All his movies (including True Romance (1993), which he only wrote and did not direct, feature a scene in which three or more characters are pointing guns at each other at the same time.



Often uses an unconventional storytelling device in his films, such as retrospect (Reservoir Dogs (1992)), non-linear (Pulp Fiction (1994)), or “chapter” format (Kill Bill: Vol.1 (2003) ).



His films will often include one long, unbroken take where a character is followed around somewhere.



Often casts comedians in small roles: ‘Stephen Wright’ as the DJ in Reservoir Dogs (1992), Kathy Griffin as an accident witness and Julia Sweeney as the junkyard guy’s daughter in Pulp Fiction (1994) , ‘Chris Tucker’ as Beaumont in Jackie Brown (1997).



Widely imitated quick cuts of character’s hands performing actions in extreme closeup, a technique reminiscent of Brian De Palma.



Long closeup of a person’s face while someone else speaks off-screen (closeup of The Bride while Bill talks, of Butch while Marsellus talks).



Aliases. He uses aliases in nearly all of his movies: Honey Bunny and Pumpkin from Pulp Fiction (1994), Mr White, Blonde, Orange etc. from Reservoir Dogs (1992). Bill’s team in Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) (Black Mamba, Copperhead, Cottonmouth, and California Mountain Snake).



Often plays a small role in his films (Jimmie Dimmick in Pulp Fiction (1994), Mr. Brown in Reservoir Dogs (1992) and the answering machinevoice in Jackie Brown (1997))



Frequently casts Michael Madsen.



Frequently casts Uma Thurman.


#3

Frequently Casts: Samuel L Jackson (3 films more than Uma & Michael, right?)


#4

You forgot CU’s of women’s feet. :stuck_out_tongue:


#5

tut tut IMDB is loosing it’s touch lol


#6

Tarantinos trademark style: COOL. Whatever he does is cool.


#7

[quote=“Ify”]
It always has a Dutch element in his films: The opening tune, Little Green Bag, in Reservoir Dogs was performed by George Baker and written by Jan Gerbrand Visser and Benjamino Bouwens who are all Dutch. The character Freddy Newandyke, played by Tim Roth is a direct translation to a typical Dutch last name, Nieuwendijk. The code name of Tim Roth is Mr. Orange, the royal color of Holland, and the last name of the royal family. The Amsterdam conversation in PulpFiction, Vincent Vega smokes from a Dutch tobacco shag (Samson), the mentioning of Rutger Hauer in Jackie Brown, the bride’s name is Beatrix, the name of the Royal Dutch Queen.
[/quote]

Actually it’s Drum, at least that’s what it says on the rolling paper.


#8

[quote=“Marvins_Brains”]
Tarantinos trademark style: COOL. Whatever he does is cool.
[/quote] yes, agree one hundred percent Tarantino is cool and a minimalist a true French Connection.


#9

[quote=“Ify”]
From IMDB:



Trade mark

His main characters drive cars from Chevrolet, such as Jules’ 1974 Nova and Vincent’s 1960s Malibu. He often frames characters with doorways and shows them opening and closing doors. Much of the violence and minor character dialogue is offscreen in his films.



Briefcases and suitcases play an important role in Pulp Fiction (1994), Reservoir Dogs (1992), Jackie Brown (1997), True Romance (1993), and Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004).



Makes references to cult movies and television.



Frequently works with Harvey Keitel.



His films usually have a shot from inside a car trunk.



Frequently casts Tim Roth



Lead characters usually drive General Motors vehicles, particularly Chevrolet and Cadillac.



It always has a Dutch element in his films: The opening tune, Little Green Bag, in Reservoir Dogs was performed by George Baker and written by Jan Gerbrand Visser and Benjamino Bouwens who are all Dutch. The character Freddy Newandyke, played by Tim Roth is a direct translation to a typical Dutch last name, Nieuwendijk. The code name of Tim Roth is Mr. Orange, the royal color of Holland, and the last name of the royal family. The Amsterdam conversation in PulpFiction, Vincent Vega smokes from a Dutch tobacco shag (Samson), the mentioning of Rutger Hauer in Jackie Brown, the bride’s name is Beatrix, the name of the Royal Dutch Queen.



The Mexican Standoff: All his movies (including True Romance (1993), which he only wrote and did not direct, feature a scene in which three or more characters are pointing guns at each other at the same time.



Often uses an unconventional storytelling device in his films, such as retrospect (Reservoir Dogs (1992)), non-linear (Pulp Fiction (1994)), or “chapter” format (Kill Bill: Vol.1 (2003) ).



His films will often include one long, unbroken take where a character is followed around somewhere.



Often casts comedians in small roles: ‘Stephen Wright’ as the DJ in Reservoir Dogs (1992), Kathy Griffin as an accident witness and Julia Sweeney as the junkyard guy’s daughter in Pulp Fiction (1994) , ‘Chris Tucker’ as Beaumont in Jackie Brown (1997).



Widely imitated quick cuts of character’s hands performing actions in extreme closeup, a technique reminiscent of Brian De Palma.



Long closeup of a person’s face while someone else speaks off-screen (closeup of The Bride while Bill talks, of Butch while Marsellus talks).



Aliases. He uses aliases in nearly all of his movies: Honey Bunny and Pumpkin from Pulp Fiction (1994), Mr White, Blonde, Orange etc. from Reservoir Dogs (1992). Bill’s team in Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) (Black Mamba, Copperhead, Cottonmouth, and California Mountain Snake).



Often plays a small role in his films (Jimmie Dimmick in Pulp Fiction (1994), Mr. Brown in Reservoir Dogs (1992) and the answering machinevoice in Jackie Brown (1997))



Frequently casts Michael Madsen.



Frequently casts Uma Thurman.
[/quote] i guess Tarantino’s ’ unconventional storytelling device’ is derived from the narrative structure of a novel. a novel can be read from the last chapter first the first chapter next and the middle chapter last and i think this is what happens in PULP FICTION, and it all makes perfect sense. Basically Tarantino is messing with our minds and i like it.


#10

[quote=“johnbhaktul”]
i guess Tarantino’s ’ unconventional storytelling device’ is derived from the narrative structure of a novel. a novel can be read from the last chapter first the first chapter next and the middle chapter last and i think this is what happens in PULP FICTION, and it all makes perfect sense. Basically Tarantino is messing with our minds and i like it.
[/quote]

Yep definately. His story telling resembles those of novels, which is intentional, as he has said on a few occassions that he likes to tell stories in movies like they were novels. Didn’t he even say that when he retires from filmmaking (in 15 years time) he is going to write novels?


#11

[quote=“Vince_Vega”]
Actually it’s Drum, at least that’s what it says on the rolling paper.
[/quote]

My dad smokes Drum. I feel much cooler now.


#12

ugh, i hate shag, its too heavy, only metalheads smoke it over here, i just fuck with filters


#13

If I have enough money I buy cigarettes, but most of the time that’s not the case. Actually shag is much better to smoke but I hate rolling one, especially in winter time when my fingers are frozen.


#14

[quote=“Ify”]
Yep definately. His story telling resembles those of novels, which is intentional, as he has said on a few occassions that he likes to tell stories in movies like they were novels. Didn’t he even say that when he retires from filmmaking (in 15 years time) he is going to write novels?
[/quote]
Was the script for PF written the non linear way, or did Tarantino fix the film the non linear way while editing?


#15

It was written in a non-linear way.