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Question about screenplays


#1

I’ve started several screenplays over the last few years but I’ve always gotten stuck around the 20 to 30 page mark. Im at it again.

The main difference this time is that I’m actually trying to write itlike a script from the begining, usually I would either write it sloppily by hand with camera shots, jumbled up action (backtracking action/description for the sake of not breaking up dialog), and it’s almost written like a play. I just always kindof figured I’d transfer it to screenplay form when it was finished.

This time though I’m trying to get it as close as I can to a screenplay, which is kindof a chore (since I’m just using word perfect, to cheep/poor to use anything else) but I think somehow it’s helping my dialog.

My question here is actually kind of simple when I introduce a character should I call them by a general name until a real name is given?

Ex. david’s mom, girl, bum

Or should I call them by the name later given, even if it’s not for several pages?



Or should I just keep refering to them as the general name, even if the name is later given(I’m pretty much talking about secondary characters).



I will probably keep posting stuff on this post, if I come into anymore problems, I think for the most part they will all be technical.


#2

[quote]My question here is actually kind of simple when I introduce a character should I call them by a general name until a real name is given?

Ex. david’s mom, girl, bum

Or should I call them by the name later given, even if it’s not for several pages?[/quote]

Well it depends. If you’re writing a mystery, and revealing the person’s name would give it away, then no, you wouldn’t.



For everything else: you introduce the character in the action.



For example:



A young man (23) lays down on a sofa watching TV. This is THOMAS MCDONALD.



OR



THOMAS MCDONALD, 23, lays down on a sofa watching TV.


#3

i would call them by names later given


#4

Ok here’s my second question. I have a character that has several short daydreams within actual scenes. How do I corectly tell that he is in a frame of mind, then switches back to reality? Should I write all of the daydreams as a scene change, then his returns as one too? Or should I write these daydreams in as action?


#5

you could just get like a * and put somewhere in the screenplay that * means daydream starts and * closes the daydream , and then use them in a scene


#6

NAMES LATER GIVEN



But make sure even the descriptive title is capitalized the first time used in action sluglines



A OLD BUM wearily glances at the people passing by him.



And also above every line of dialogue



OLD MAN

I need food and a job and I’m old!



LOL bad dialogue but its like 12:00 am gimme a break.



You get my point, and that’s all that matters.



Goodluck! :wink: