Quentin's favorite grindhouse movies


#21

Why did QT laugh at I Drink Your Blood? Haven’t watched the movie. Anyone care to enlighten me? :-*


#22

OMG! QT’s so cool. I wish I could just follow him around every day and learn things from him. Wait, that sounds a bit stalkerish. Withdrawn.


#23

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre really brought a whole new genre, where we have a group of unsuspecting teens traipsing into uncharted woods or houses and then to their own surprise, some monster or freaky cannibal is stalking them - that device is still used today by the way. Tobe Hooper made this film for 35,000 with his friends - I understand why QT would choose it as his number one. But to me the real number one film in the exploitation genre is George A. Romero’s Dawn Of The Dead. I consider it my Citizen Kane truth be told because I just can’t get enough of it, and also the epic scope of it. George knows how to build the mythology of the film and even though we are just following four characters who seek refuge in a shopping mall, we still believe the whole world is the brink of extinction because of this mysterious zombi apocalypse that first started with his Night Of The Living Dead. Was it a satellite with high levels of radiation that crashed into the earth, was it god, was it a virus? George will never tell you. That’s just how the real world is. There is never a true answer.


#24

[quote=“Scarface”]
Why did QT laugh at I Drink Your Blood? Haven’t watched the movie. Anyone care to enlighten me? :-*
[/quote]

because it’s a fun snappy film, but it’s not very good at all…


#25

[quote=“tonyanthony”]
because it’s a fun snappy film, but it’s not very good at all…
[/quote]

?



That’s like saying Easy Rider is a monumental and revolutionary film…But it kinda sucks.


#26

that’s not at all what i meant. i meant you can have a good time watching I dring your blood, but by the end of the day, it’s not very good. the first time i saw easy rider, i was very young and expecting a lot and thought the film was a piece of shit. Then, i saw it again, maybe ten years later, with no expectations at all and was pleasantly surprised. overall, the film is a time capsule, it bares almost no interests, but there are a couple of fun scenes in it. same thing with i drink your blood. if you have no expectation before watching it, you may have a pleasant fun time.


#27

[quote=“NonStop”]
Oh, and Sebastian, do you have a general top 20 movie list from him?
[/quote]

He had made such a list when he was younger, maybe even before Jackie Brown was released. I have it in a French book. I might copy it and add it to the wiki. I’ll do tonight or tomorrow. But the list wasn’t definite and as I recall, there was like a top 5 and random runners up.



Btw Seb, thanks a lot for this new list, this is great. It’s not that much surprising, cause we all know already much of the movies he quoted and know that he loved them too. Even if some users are surprised about Romero, I was more about TCM.



Too bad there aren’t any runners up indeed, I’d like to have more movies to check out.


#28

[quote=“cyber-lili”]

He had made such a list when he was younger, maybe even before Jackie Brown was released. I have it in a French book. I might copy it and add it to the wiki. I’ll do tonight or tomorrow. But the list wasn’t definite and as I recall, there was like a top 5 and random runners up.



Can you give us the link or post the list here too?

Thanks.

I own his strictly unofficial coolest movie list but I don´t know if this list was from the man personaly.

Thank there were a few list of top 10 movies in magazines …

We all kno the sight and sound list.

In his latest list in empire magazine, “Five Fingers Of Death” was no. 6 (all-time-favourites). And now it is no. 7 of the grindhouse flicks ???


#29

No one feels the same way about Dawn Of The Dead?



It’s a lonely world.



insert mopey emoticon here


#30

[quote=“cyber-lili”]
Even if some users are surprised about Romero, I was more about TCM.
[/quote]

Why would anyone be surprised that Romero made his list?



Romero has a new quote btw. Here it is:



“Respect…the cock”.



Courtesy of Frankie TJ Mackey, Master of the muffin.


#31

[quote=“Kinick”]
That would have definitely been something.



Halloween (I don’t know what the basis this is as being a grindhouse flick - distribution? - but I at least don’t consider it an exploitation flick)

[/quote]

Halloween revitalized the slasher genre, the genre that Sire Hitchcock created with Psycho. And the distribution was minimal at first. It made virtually no money, but thanks to word of mouth - it garnered a large audience and then kablamo! It was picked up and it became a staple horror film. The films that this bad boy spawned were: Friday The 13th, Silent Night Deadly Night, Nightmare On Elm Street (sort of) - and other 80s-90s cheesy knockoffs.


#32

[quote=“BioBasterd”]
Halloween revitalized the slasher genre, the genre that Sire Hitchcock created with Psycho. And the distribution was minimal at first. It made virtually no money, but thanks to word of mouth - it garnered a large audience and then kablamo! It was picked up and it became a staple horror film. The films that this bad boy spawned were: Friday The 13th, Silent Night Deadly Night, Nightmare On Elm Street (sort of) - and other 80s-90s cheesy knockoffs.
[/quote]

Yeah I know all that, but I don’t see why he seen this fit for grindhouse criteria. Certainly by the reasons you listed, it wouldn’t be classified as grindhouse, but more likely “cult”.



He’s probably judging it on where it first played when it was released.


#33

[quote=“BioBasterd”]
No one feels the same way about Dawn Of The Dead?



It’s a lonely world.



insert mopey emoticon here
[/quote]

no, i do too… but the european cut 8)


#34

[quote=“BioBasterd”]
Why would anyone be surprised that Romero made his list?
[/quote]

Here’s the answer :

[quote=“magazine79”]
the list surprises me a lot. Didn´t now he likes romero and TcM. But a great list of course.

I expected more kung fu flicks in it.
[/quote]

I’m not surprised, I LOVE Romero and btw I feel the same way about Dawn of the Dead, even if I wouldn’t consider it as my Citizen Kane, I love it a lot. And I’m glad Tarantino put it at the top of his list, even if he could have chosen some more grindhouse flick to brag.


#35

The reason why I was surprised is that he often named nightmare city and stuff as his favourite zombie movies.

But we all know the he don´t like it to talk about movies that everyone likes.



cyber-ilili: what´s about your tarantino-list?


#36

Yeah, I was surpsised he didn’t shit about, too, and put The Texas Chainsaw Massacre straight at the top of the bunch. I’m sure a lot of us expected his tops to be populated with obscure exploitation movies that many non-grindhouse fans wouldn’t have even heard of (me).


#37

exactly and that’s what’s great about this list, it’s only classic films, almost Horror Films 101…

although, as far as i am concerned, i’d choose day of the dead instead of night of the living dead. :stuck_out_tongue:


#38

[quote=“magazine79”]
cyber-ilili: what´s about your tarantino-list?
[/quote]

So it’s in a French book, called, Quentin Tarantino, fils de pulp, I know it’s from another english/american book but I remember which one. So you must have probably already seen this list. Btw the book and the list was made after Jackie Brown.



The list is called : The list of the coolest movies of all time


  1. Rio Bravo
  2. Taxi Driver
  3. Blow Out



    Not in order and not a definite list :

    One-Eyed Jacks

    Breathless (James McBride)

    His Girl Friday

    Rolling Thunder (already a runner up)

    Badlands

    Casualties of War

    Used Cars

    It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World

    Judge Roy Bean

    Where Eagles Dare

    The Dirty Dozen

    Bringing Up Baby

    The Killer

    The Driver

    Blood Simple

    Long Good Friday

    Mona Lisa

    The Hit

    The Killers (Don Siegel version)

    Comfort and Joy

    Local Hero

    Le Petit Soldat (Godard)

    Vivre sa vie (Godard)

    A Bout de Souffle (Godard)

    Bande A Part (Godard)

    Pierrot Le Fou (Godard)

    Shaft

    The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (which is now somewhere in his top 5 and not just a runner up)

    The Killing

    The Asphalt Jungle

    Rififi

    The Taking of Pelham 123

    City on Fire

    Kiss Me Deadly

    Pope of Greenwich Village

    A Clockwork Orange

    Fandango

    Days of Thunder

    Night Call Nurses

    Jules et Jim

    A Girl in Every Port

    The Guns of Navarone

    Dead Poets Society

    Frogs

    Willard (1971 Daniel Man version)

    Nights of the Lepus

    Dark Passage

    The Last Boy Scout

    Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom

    Year of the Dragon

    Scarface (De Palma)

    Topkapi

    The Thomas Crown Affair (1968 Norman Jewison version)

    Once Upon a Time in America

    Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

    Abbot and Costello Meet the Mummy

    Hi Momi

    Back Street

    Maniac Cop Two

    Intruder

    The Vigilante

    Perfect

    Mad Love

    The Trip

    The Last Seduction

    Ed Wood

    Salvador

    For a Few Dollars

    Le Doulos

    They Live by Night

    The Long Goodbye

    Coffy

    Magnificient Obsession

    Savage Seven

    The Thing

    Caged Heat

    Silver Bullet

    Kansas City Confidential





    Alright, that’s it. If anyone needs more details on any of this movies, just tell me and I’ll write the director and release date. And if anyone has any idea where it was first published, just tell me too so that I can add it to the wiki. I can’t till I haven’t the source. Thanks.

#39

As for today, The Good, the bad and the Ugly is nb 1 of his Top 3… :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote=“Kinick”]
Yeah I know all that, but I don’t see why he seen this fit for grindhouse criteria. Certainly by the reasons you listed, it wouldn’t be classified as grindhouse, but more likely “cult”.

[/quote]

oh Halloween, just like Assault on precinct 13 is an exploitation film, and therefore played grindhouses theaters… being or not an exploitation film is smg that is link to the production company and distribution of the film. i think somewhat Halloween doesn’t feel much like an exploitation films because Carpenter quickly moved to bigger studio films and doesn’t have the image of being an exploitation director, but still… still, that doesn’t provide those two films (assault on precinct 13 has my preference) of being masterpieces.


#40

[quote=“tonyanthony”]
As for today, The Good, the bad and the Ugly is nb 1 of his Top 3… :stuck_out_tongue:



oh Halloween, just like Assault on precinct 13 is an exploitation film, and therefore played grindhouses theaters… being or not an exploitation film is smg that is link to the production company and distribution of the film. i think somewhat Halloween doesn’t feel much like an exploitation films because Carpenter quickly moved to bigger studio films and doesn’t have the image of being an exploitation director, but still… still, that doesn’t provide those two films (assault on precinct 13 has my preference) of being masterpieces.
[/quote]

I always assumed that it was film’s subject matter that determined if it was an exploitation film or not. Halloween doesn’t feel like an exploitation film because there are not really many exploitation elements. But if it’s to do with studios and distribution then that’s a different story…