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My own Movie


#1

okay, first things first, I’m from Austria and together with my girlfriend I want to make my own movie: MACBETH from William Shakespeare! We want to use the basic idea and the original dialogues but transfer the set from Scotland (because we’re from Austria) into the Gothic-scene in Austria…

What do you think about the whole ide?

thx, Pap3r


#2

Kinda like what Baz Luhrman did with Romeo+Juliet?


#3

I recently did something like that, but without the original dialogue. I did it on a different Shakespeare play, Titus Andronicus, which is known as the first “Pulp Fiction”, because of all the crazy shit that goes on in it. If you want to check it out it’s at http://www.justinproductions.com/movie

and its called titus.wmv.


#4

yeah, kinda R+J, but with a gothic-basement, but yesterday we had the idea to make kinda vampiremovie out of it :wink:


#5

[quote=“Pap3r”]
okay, first things first, I’m from Austria and together with my girlfriend I want to make my own movie: MACBETH from William Shakespeare! We want to use the basic idea and the original dialogues but transfer the set from Scotland (because we’re from Austria) into the Gothic-scene in Austria…

What do you think about the whole ide?

thx, Pap3r
[/quote]

wicked, i live in autria hit me up if you need some baaaad ass screenplays.


#6

Its been done. Not saying you cant do it better or that you shouldn’t do it. Its a great movie called Scotland P.A. Even if its not what your thinking of making, its a great movie. You might want to check it out.





Think of Scotland, PA. as truck-stop Shakespeare, Macbeth given a drive-through makeover as the deadliest of deadpan comedies. Writer-director Billy Morrissette got this wacky idea from an early job at Dairy Queen. He makes the most of that bad memory by casting his own wife (ER’s Maura Tierney) and indie stalwart James LeGros as Pat and Mac McBeth, a married pair of Pennsylvanian schemers, circa 1973, who plot to escape their thankless jobs at Duncan’s burger joint. They dispatch Duncan in a sizzling accident (you want fries with that corpse?) and inherit the diner from Duncan’s stoner son (who’s also a suspect), hoping to prove to Detective McDuff (Christopher Walken, at his funniest) that their newfound happiness is entirely legal. Like The Big Lebowski, this movie’s hilarious if you’re in on the joke, and familiarity with Shakespeare is optional when you’ve got a “rock block” of Bad Company hits to keep the grisly comedy on track. --Jeff Shannon