Movie (& pop culture) Influences / References


#141

I like the similarities between Kill Bill and Inglourious Basterds. In Kill Bill, it did not take Lisa Wong long to send a hit on the bride’s head. In that scene, the bride says, “I am better than Annie Oakley and I have you right in my sight.” Then the bride tells the would be killer that she is pregnant, and they talk their way out of the sticky situation. In Inglourious Basterds, Wilhelm is a new father in the chapter “Operation Kino.” Stiglitz points his gun at Hellstrom’s testicles and says, “And at this range I am a regular Fredrick Zoeller.” Wilhelm is not able to get out of the sticky situation. Not exactly the same, but has the same vibes.


#142

[quote]I like the similarities between Kill Bill and Inglourious Basterds. In Kill Bill, it did not take Lisa Wong long to send a hit on the bride’s head. In that scene, the bride says, “I am better than Annie Oakley and I have you right in my sight.” Then the bride tells the would be killer that she is pregnant, and they talk their way out of the sticky situation. In Inglourious Basterds, Wilhelm is a new father in the chapter “Operation Kino.” Stiglitz points his gun at Hellstrom’s testicles and says, “And at this range I am a regular Fredrick Zoeller.” Wilhelm is not able to get out of the sticky situation. Not exactly the same, but has the same vibes.[/quote]

There are more dialogue similarities to other QT movies. When Aldo says that Landa’s proposal sounds like a fantasy, Landa retorts that he would be right in 999.999 cases, but not in this one. This is similar to, again, Beatrix versus Lisa scene in KB, where Lisa disbelieves Bride about being a mother.


#143

[quote=“Bob Rock”][quote]I like the similarities between Kill Bill and Inglourious Basterds. In Kill Bill, it did not take Lisa Wong long to send a hit on the bride’s head. In that scene, the bride says, “I am better than Annie Oakley and I have you right in my sight.” Then the bride tells the would be killer that she is pregnant, and they talk their way out of the sticky situation. In Inglourious Basterds, Wilhelm is a new father in the chapter “Operation Kino.” Stiglitz points his gun at Hellstrom’s testicles and says, “And at this range I am a regular Fredrick Zoeller.” Wilhelm is not able to get out of the sticky situation. Not exactly the same, but has the same vibes.[/quote][/quote]

There are more dialogue similarities to other QT movies. When Aldo says that Landa’s proposal sounds like a fantasy, Landa retorts that he would be right in 999.999 cases, but not in this one. This is similar to, again, Beatrix versus Lisa scene in KB, where Lisa disbelieves Bride about being a mother.[/quott e]



There are a lot more I just liked that one. Also, Bridget Von Hammersmark says, “I know this is a silly question before I ask it, but do you Americans speak any other language than english?” In Kill Bill Vol. 2, Bill said to Budd, “I know this is a ridiculous question before I ask it, but have you kept up with your sword play?”


#144

Shosanna, Hans and Aldo obviously represents The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. The similarities between them are many. Tuco getting caught at in the beginning shouting insults about Blondie, wish also Brad Pitt gets in the end of IB. Shouting insults abot Germany. The snuff they both use. Both are funny characters, etc.



The similarities between Hans and Angel Eyes is even more. Like the opening of each film etc.


#145

I posted this somewhere else but thought it fit better here…at the Cinemapocalypse film fest in Austin Tx, QT screened Basterds along with a few other films that had somesort of influence on IB



the films:

The Losers (73’)

Siege at Firebase Gloria (89’)

Vigilante (83’)

The Black Gestapo (75’)



an asian film called Ip Man was also shown, dont know if that counts as an influence though…ive seen The Losers (kinda dumb, however the music is great) and Siege at Firebase Gloria and I must say that Firebase is one of the best Vietnam movies ive ever seen…just saying



here’s a link coverage to the event



<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.filmschoolrejects.com/film-f … -colea.php”>http://www.filmschoolrejects.com/film-festivals/the-6-films-of-cinemapocalypse-2009-colea.php</LINK_TEXT>


#146

Hi guys,

just watched I.B. and noticed a few intertextual references and wanted to see what I’d all missed. I picked up a couple of things I’ve not seen mentioned yet - sorry if they have and I’ve overlooked.



The rope scar around Aldo’s neck is a reference to Clint Eastwood in Hang Em High, who is lynched at the start of the film and has an identical scar as a result.



A few things that triggered my memory but I can’t put a specific reference to:



The scene of the Basterd who can’t speak Italian falling over trying to get out of the cinema, and his entire schtick was very reminiscent of Manuel from Fawlty Towers, and the Italian comedian Roberto Benigni.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000905/



The scene at the start of the girl running from the house, shown through the door, then the shot of The Jew Hunter taking aim with the pistol. The first one I can’t place, definitely a Western, but the second shot was very like scenes in For A Few Dollars More (Lee Van Cleef shooting with his extended pistol near the start) and Django (releasing prisoners and shooting them) when someone is running and is gunned down from a distance.



I’m sure the scene where the Iron Cross is pointed out and the officer says “…it was for bravery” is a reference to Cross of Iron, where Max Schell is obsessed with getting one for bravery, but it’s been awhile since I’ve seen it.



Both British characters were modelled on, the absolute legend, George Sanders - but I didn’t spot any explicit references to his films.



Anyway, hope those help jog someone’s memory!


#147

ya know…I was thinking about it…and Archie Hicox’s character and specifically his scene in La Louiseanne reminds me of Richard Burton’s character in Where Eagles Dare


#148

I always thought Raine’s neck scar was a reference to “The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean”. The main character in that survives a lynching attempt as well, and his scar is never mentioned for the rest of the movie. I first heard of the film from a list of Tarantino favorites, which is why i was sure that was where the reference was based from.


#149

[quote=“Movie_Villain”]I posted this somewhere else but thought it fit better here…at the Cinemapocalypse film fest in Austin Tx, QT screened Basterds along with a few other films that had somesort of influence on IB



the films:

The Losers (73’)

Siege at Firebase Gloria (89’)

Vigilante (83’)

The Black Gestapo (75’)[/quote]

The Black Gestapo poster actually looks like the IB one, it might not be a coincidence :




#150

Man the Black Gestapo sucks ass, if only the movie were half as cool as the poster.


#151

[quote=“Col. Crazy Kenneth”]Man the Black Gestapo sucks ass, if only the movie were half as cool as the poster.[/quote]

Ahah. I haven’t even seen the movie. Not sure I will that soon, I got other priorities. But at least that was fun to discover the poster and realize the similarity.


#152

[quote=“robertdiggs36”][quote=“Bob Rock”][quote]I like the similarities between Kill Bill and Inglourious Basterds. In Kill Bill, it did not take Lisa Wong long to send a hit on the bride’s head. In that scene, the bride says, “I am better than Annie Oakley and I have you right in my sight.” Then the bride tells the would be killer that she is pregnant, and they talk their way out of the sticky situation. In Inglourious Basterds, Wilhelm is a new father in the chapter “Operation Kino.” Stiglitz points his gun at Hellstrom’s testicles and says, “And at this range I am a regular Fredrick Zoeller.” Wilhelm is not able to get out of the sticky situation. Not exactly the same, but has the same vibes.[/quote][/quote]

There are more dialogue similarities to other QT movies. When Aldo says that Landa’s proposal sounds like a fantasy, Landa retorts that he would be right in 999.999 cases, but not in this one. This is similar to, again, Beatrix versus Lisa scene in KB, where Lisa disbelieves Bride about being a mother.[/quott e]



There are a lot more I just liked that one. Also, Bridget Von Hammersmark says, “I know this is a silly question before I ask it, but do you Americans speak any other language than english?” In Kill Bill Vol. 2, Bill said to Budd, “I know this is a ridiculous question before I ask it, but have you kept up with your sword play?”[/quote]

Another one is when Landa tells Lapadite his theory about rats, and Lapadite says, “it’s an interesting theory, colonel” (or something close to that). It’s similar to Jules’ reaction when Vincent finally gets through to him about foot massages: “it’s an interesting point.”


#153

I guess this is the right thread for this: has anyone else seen “The White Hell of Piz Palu”? I had heard of it for a number of years–it’s one of the most famous German silent films–but I had never seen it. After the multiple references in IB, I decided to check it out. There’s a good DVD of it in the US from Kino, so I got it on Netflix.



Wow–what a movie! The emphasis is more on the spectacle of treacherous mountain climbing in snow and ice than it is on the story, but I thought it was amazing. The mountain vistas and the frightening snowfalls are really gripping. It’s extremely vivid, which was generally the biggest strength of the best German cinema of that era.


#154

Here’s a big work-in-progress list of references/influences:



<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.scarecrow.com/2009/08/27/bef … -basterds/”>http://www.scarecrow.com/2009/08/27/before-they-were-basterds/</LINK_TEXT>


#155

[quote=“Dead Zed”]Here’s a big work-in-progress list of references/influences:



<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.scarecrow.com/2009/08/27/bef … -basterds/”>http://www.scarecrow.com/2009/08/27/before-they-were-basterds/</LINK_TEXT>[/quote]

That’s some interesting list but the Winnetou picture you?/they’re using is actually an audio play. :police:



Anyway, I think The Searchers can not only be seen as referenced throught that shot but in general through the whole scalping affair, can’t it?



And A thing I haven’t read about anywhere yet: The cigarrette stubbed out in the cream. That must be To Catch A Thief, you know, the prominent cigarette in the egg scene. Big question here: Hitchcock reportedly hated eggs, does that mean QT dislikes cream?


#156

I don’t a have a thing to do with that list, I haven’t even seen Basterds yet, so I can’t answer your questions :slight_smile:


#157

[quote=“Dead Zed”]I don’t a have a thing to do with that list, I haven’t even seen Basterds yet, so I can’t answer your questions :slight_smile:[/quote]


No one asked.

#158

How about Romeo and Juliet? It’s obvious that’s the story that influenced Shosanna and Zoller’s story. The fact that Shosanna checks on Zoller as he’s dying suggests that there WERE feelings but it’s just that she struggled with it since he’s basically her enemy (2 houses, yada yadda)…and of course the double death. Even when they meet Shosanna is high up a ladder a la Juliet being high up a balcony


#159

The use of music from Eastern Condors is not just a music reference: In Eastern Condors the same music is played as a character runs in slowmotion, very simular to how Omar runs.


#160

[quote=“Dead Zed”]Here’s a big work-in-progress list of references/influences:



<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.scarecrow.com/2009/08/27/bef … -basterds/”>http://www.scarecrow.com/2009/08/27/before-they-were-basterds/</LINK_TEXT>[/quote]

Surprised to not see The Wild Bunch in there.



Hugo’s flashback shows that he has the same memory (Even from the same angle!) of being whipped by his captors. Just like Deke Thorton (Robert Ryan)