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Maybe you all can help me understand


#1

I was under the impression that the solicitor of a screenplay, was the lit. agent or someone acting as the writers agent(cy). Why do the big wig agencies (William Morris, ICM, etc.) say they don’t read unsolicited material? Who the hell is supposed to represent you to the agency? >:( ???


#2

well before you send scripts around you should register them. did you do that? i think final draft offers a service for that. in order for companies to deal with them they have to be somewhat registered or legally protected, else they won’t even open them. but i am not an expert in that


#3

It’s already registered through WGA west and copyrighted. I just don’t understand who is supposed to liason between the author and the bigger agencies.


#4

[quote=“reciprocal_1974”]
It’s already registered through WGA west and copyrighted. I just don’t understand who is supposed to liason between the author and the bigger agencies.
[/quote]

well why send it to the agencies then? why not send it to directors or production companies? i think that would be more efficient, because then you’re reaching the creative branch of hollywood that might actually like something (as opposed to big companies that just think in terms of money)


#5

I was under the impression that directors and production companies would not read unsolicited material. It makes sense to me that they need the credibility of an agent to ensure they’re not reading garbage. I get that. I used the Agency Guide to contact agents; is there a guide for directors and production companies who read unsolicited material? Thanks, in advance, for your help.


#6

There’s a page on the WGA site that has contacts. On the right, under writers - go to tools and then click Guild-Signatory Agents and Agencies. The list won’t be up until September. But it will have current contacts to send your Queries too.



The best thing to do is to send a Query letter to production houses and agents. Asking if they want to read your script. Forget about directors and companies like William Morris. They simply won’t do it without INCREDIBLE contacts. There is a guide for production companies, I think this is it: <LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/de … s&n=507846”>http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1928936393/qid=1121485150/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-0594613-6827169?v=glance&s=books&n=507846</LINK_TEXT>



Or try here - http://www.storyscribe.com/hcd001.html



Here’s the blurb -



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