Kill Bill Movie reference (please contribute)


#361

Nice one, Pete. I loved that scene though. Wished he kept it in.


#362

Thanks If. Yeah, that was gonna be Bills intro chapter, but I actually really liked how he did it in the film more. He made him mysterious like a James Bond villain. :slight_smile:


#363

Yeah, the way he did introduce Bill was awesome, particularly when you finally see his face in Volume 2. I guess it’s because I love Bill so much, his mannerisms, the way he talks and stuff, that I just want to see more of him. The Cherry Pie chapter was just so fucking cool, would have loved he filmed it and just put it as an extra on the DVD.


#364

Actually the Cherry pie chapter was sort of James Bondish too. The way he had the private casino game set up. But it def wouldve been neat to see how he wouldve shot it.



I think that Da Moe outtake sequence may have been adapted from Cherry Pie. The whole samurai sword face off thing was in there.


#365

[quote=“PutneySwope”]
Actually the Cherry pie chapter was sort of James Bondish too. The way he had the private casino game set up. But it def wouldve been neat to see how he wouldve shot it.



I think that Da Moe outtake sequence may have been adapted from Cherry Pie. The whole samurai sword face off thing was in there.
[/quote]

When you said James Bond-like in your earlier post, I immediately though of the Cherry Pie chapter. But when you used it to represent his actual introduction, you got me thinking, QT probably saw Bill as a James Bond-like Villain. Which is very interesting to me considering his advances at making Casino Royale.


#366

We know he likes to throw all kinds of elements into his movies. And Kill Bill with the DiVAS is sort of close to the spy/evil mastermind genre. Its just assassins instead, but they are very spy like themselves and Bill is like the head evil mastermind like Blofeld or Fu Manchu.


#367

[quote=“PutneySwope”]
We know he likes to throw all kinds of elements into his movies. And Kill Bill with the DiVAS is sort of close to the spy/evil mastermind genre. Its just assassins instead, but they are very spy like themselves and Bill is like the head evil mastermind like Blofeld or Fu Manchu.
[/quote]

Yes, but an interesting spin in that Bill can be very compassionate. You can tell he loves all his DiVAS (and Sophie). It’s more like a family unit. But he still has that coldness to him as personified by your averge Bond villain.


#368

Its kinda like the mafia too, if you take off on the family, theyll get ya.


#369

Yeah, absolutely. I say I don’t want to see any more Kill Bill-related films/anime/TV Series etc, but it would be cool to see the DiVAS operating within their hayday. You know… see how they solve “unfinished business”. I wonder if they worked individually or as a team as well sometimes?!


#370

I think what QT shouldve done was make the anime prequels and include them in Kill Bill: Whole Bloody Affair. God knows hes had enough time!


#371

It might be crazy but… I’ve always seen the DiVAS as bad version of Charlie’s Angels and Bill is just like Charlie because, you know, we never see him at the beginning, we can only hear his voice telling what to do and so did Charlie…







Please tell me that makes some sense :-</E>


#372

It does, but maybe it’s not what QT thought of (even if this can appear as an obvious influence). Don’t worry, babydoll, you’re not such a fool around all these geeks posting about asian or exploitation references :stuck_out_tongue:


#373

I think this will be one of the few entirely literary references or rather influences on Kill Bill. The encounter of Beatrix and Vernita at the beginning of the first movie is, I believe, loosely modelled after a J. D. Salinger short story, namely “Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut”. The story is about two women, Mary Jane and Eloise, who haven’t seen each other since high school, and, in the meantime, married and had children. Similarities: Mary Jane drives in her car up to Eloise’s house, when both Eloise’s husband and daughter are out. They went to college together, but haven’t seen each other since and this is the first time they meet again. They mainly talk about their respective husbands and children. While M.J. and E. are having a drink, Eloise’s little daughter, Ramona, comes home and interrupts their conversation. M.J. complements her dress by saying: “Oh, what a pretty dress!” in the same manner that Beatrix complements Nikia’s name. And, when M.J. asks Ramona whether she has a “beau”, Ramona is silent, until E. says: “Mary Jane, asked you a question, Ramona.” and later repeats the question: “Mary Jane asked you if you have a beau.”



That’s about it. I know it’s not much but I think the parallels are there, although the relationship between the characters is definitely quite different.



I also have two questions. In the script there’s a scene that was never filmed: Beatrix’s face is superimposed by a head of a lioness while she breathes in and out. Was just wondering if that’s from any movie or cartoon or anywhere at all. The same goes for the Bill’s bullet errupting in slow motion from the gun: never seen that before, maybe only in a cartoon. Any thoughts on that one? Cheers!


#374

Bill’s bullett in slo-mo is a reference to a Dario Argento film but I can’t remember which one.


#375

[quote=“Bob Rock”]
I think this will be one of the few entirely literary references or rather influences on Kill Bill. The encounter of Beatrix and Vernita at the beginning of the first movie is, I believe, loosely modelled after a J. D. Salinger short story, namely “Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut”. The story is about two women, Mary Jane and Eloise, who haven’t seen each other since high school, and, in the meantime, married and had children. Similarities: Mary Jane drives in her car up to Eloise’s house, when both Eloise’s husband and daughter are out. They went to college together, but haven’t seen each other since and this is the first time they meet again. They mainly talk about their respective husbands and children. While M.J. and E. are having a drink, Eloise’s little daughter, Ramona, comes home and interrupts their conversation. M.J. complements her dress by saying: “Oh, what a pretty dress!” in the same manner that Beatrix complements Nikia’s name. And, when M.J. asks Ramona whether she has a “beau”, Ramona is silent, until E. says: “Mary Jane, asked you a question, Ramona.” and later repeats the question: “Mary Jane asked you if you have a beau.” [/quote]

I thought of this too, especially cause the dialogues are the same but wasn’t sure it was only a coincidence or not.


#376

I always thought the bullet in slo mo was from John Woo. It seemed very Woo-esque to me.



Another reference for the first chapter “2” might be a Twilight Zone episode also entitled “Two” starring Charles Bronson (one of QTs fave actors) and Elizabeth Montgomery (two soldiers who fight each other).


#377

[quote=“cyber-lili”]
I thought of this too, especially cause the dialogues are the same but wasn’t sure it was only a coincidence or not.
[/quote]

I think it’s not a coincidence because QT listed Salinger as one of his favorite writers. If he hadn’t I’d have been reluctant to see any major connection there as well.


#378

Watching the bullet being fired is taken from Dario Argento’s Opera, where we see an extreme close shot of a bullet going through the peephole of a door in a hotel room door.


#379

[quote=“PutneySwope”]
Actually the Cherry pie chapter was sort of James Bondish too. The way he had the private casino game set up. But it def wouldve been neat to see how he wouldve shot it.

[/quote]

i was going to post the same info and saw that you just did…



“The lonely grave of Paula Shultz” ---- “The lonely death of Hattie Carroll” (Bob Dylan)


#380

Please pardon me for not having read all 12 pages :o of this thread but…



In Vol.2 where Pai Mei strokes his beard and Bill talks of the five point exploding heart technique that’s a reference to the 1980 Shaw Bros. film called “Clan of the White Lotus”.