I want to do this when I'm older


#21

That’s the way I used to be too. Lately I’ve gotten better at balancing multiple projects. I’m usually writing at least three things at a time all in various stages. So, like, I’ll be writing an hour long tv show as my “priority project” but when I get stuck on a scene or something I’ll start mapping out the next episode, or I’ll be working on a treatment for a full-length script.



I’m actually in a weird place right now. The “network” that hosted my series has gone under which has left me with little to no motivation to write. I used to be able to pump out an episode a week, now I’m lucky to get a page done a day.


#22

[quote=“Dex”]
That’s the way I used to be too. Lately I’ve gotten better at balancing multiple projects. I’m usually writing at least three things at a time all in various stages. So, like, I’ll be writing an hour long tv show as my “priority project” but when I get stuck on a scene or something I’ll start mapping out the next episode, or I’ll be working on a treatment for a full-length script.



I’m actually in a weird place right now. The “network” that hosted my series has gone under which has left me with little to no motivation to write. I used to be able to pump out an episode a week, now I’m lucky to get a page done a day.
[/quote]

Maybe you should try just writing, whatever comes to mind just to keep your mind in shape and maybe you’ll even come across an idea or story that your passionate to tell and then it just kind of pours out of you.


#23

[quote=“Dex”]
I’m pretty sure all my scripts would be as shitty as the first one was if I hadn’t joined various writing communities and let them tell me how shitty it was. It’s really the only way to learn, because it’s very hard to look at your own work objectively.
[/quote]

You know what I’ve started to doing is whenever I get serious about writing something I just write, never looking back on it until a while has past. It helps to look at things with more objectivity yourself so you can really keep just telling the story instead of getting self conscious if someone tell you it blows and you don’t really feel the passion to write because, hey, someone told you it blows. You can fix what’s shit, you can’t fix it if you never wrote it out.


#24

[quote]You know what I’ve started to doing is whenever I get serious about writing something I just write, never looking back on it until a while has past. It helps to look at things with more objectivity yourself so you can really keep just telling the story instead of getting self conscious if someone tell you it blows and you don’t really feel the passion to write because, hey, someone told you it blows. You can fix what’s shit, you can’t fix it if you never wrote it out.[/quote]

I tend to not show people anything until it’s between drafts. When they point out the faults I either discard them because “the critic didn’t understand what I was doing” I write it down and use it when I start on the next draft. I think people telling you where you fall short is a good motivator. If criticism kills your motivation than you’re probly not cut out to be a writer.

[quote]Maybe you should try just writing, whatever comes to mind just to keep your mind in shape and maybe you’ll even come across an idea or story that your passionate to tell and then it just kind of pours out of you.[/quote]

I’ve never been a big fan of that. I need structure when I’m writing.


#25

[quote=“Dex”]
I tend to not show people anything until it’s between drafts. When they point out the faults I either discard them because “the critic didn’t understand what I was doing” I write it down and use it when I start on the next draft. I think people telling you where you fall short is a good motivator. If criticism kills your motivation than you’re probly not cut out to be a writer.



I’ve never been a big fan of that. I need structure when I’m writing.


[/quote]

Right on. It’s just that in writing I can take criticism better when something is more complete and closer to being finished. If you’ve given something enough time and attention then no amount of criticism in the world could kill your motivation.



But I’ve definitely learned to take criticism like a man when before I’d openly be a bitch about it. “This is a masterpiece and you don’t know art!” and shit like that.


#26

damn, alot of people commetned lol. Anyways, I kind of stopped the script, but I plan on finishing it. I mean, i got my whole life to finish it since I’m only in high school and right now I plan on trying to go into film school. Right now, I just carry a notebook around and when ever i think of an idea, i just jot it down. My family hasn’t noticed and only a couple freinds have asked me about it…they think it’s a diary or some shit, haha.



I don’t really know if I’ll show my family or freinds the script, or even tell them about it, but I plan on getting some feedback from one a freind, or maybe I’ll post it on one of those Script sites. who knows…


#27

[quote=“Dex”]


I’ve never been a big fan of that. I need structure when I’m writing.


[/quote]

I’m the complete opposite. I don’t even make notes, I store my ideas in my head. I kind of come up with the main plot points and the characters and specific scenes and sequences and I sit down and just let it all come out. See what sticks. Then I go back and fix what doesn’t work. I find it feels far less contrived when it’s written in the moment. People who structure a lot of the time tend to have stilted dialogue that just fells over wrought. And I’m veyr happy with my method, recently been shooting a short and I’m so proud of the dialogue, it sounds great on film… not to toot my own horn :stuck_out_tongue:


#28

[quote=“Noir_Fiction”]
I’m the complete opposite. I don’t even make notes, I store my ideas in my head. I kind of come up with the main plot points and the characters and specific scenes and sequences and I sit down and just let it all come out. See what sticks. Then I go back and fix what doesn’t work. I find it feels far less contrived when it’s written in the moment. People who structure a lot of the time tend to have stilted dialogue that just fells over wrought. And I’m veyr happy with my method, recently been shooting a short and I’m so proud of the dialogue, it sounds great on film… not to toot my own horn :stuck_out_tongue:
[/quote]

Just how I do it. Plus i really enjoy shit just coming to me which never happened when I tried the structured method (just once outta curiosity). at that point it just felt to me like i was filling in blanks.



But holy shit your doing a short, tell me all you can, that’s pretty cool.


#29

I tend to spend months writing notes and breaking down my characters and my stories before I even get to the script stage. For everything I’ve written (and a bunch of stuff I haven’t) I’ve got “series bibles” full of character’s back stories, current stories and future stories. I’ve got full biographies for characters I’ve never actually used in anything. I kind of think of it as my “bag of tricks”. If I need a character chances are I’ve got one lying around somewhere.



Anytime I try to write a script without a solid plan I end up with a “wandering script”. I don’t have the memory to just keep it in my head and I end up writing myself into holes. Doesn’t really affect my dialogue (not sure why it would), which I tend to think is what I’m best at. Dialogue is something I very rarely plan a head of time. I pretty much just write detailed treatments giving each scene a goal. I usually have no idea how I’m going to accomplish that goal until I get to the script stage though.


#30

[quote=“Dex”]
I tend to spend months writing notes and breaking down my characters and my stories before I even get to the script stage. For everything I’ve written (and a bunch of stuff I haven’t) I’ve got “series bibles” full of character’s back stories, current stories and future stories. I’ve got full biographies for characters I’ve never actually used in anything. I kind of think of it as my “bag of tricks”. If I need a character chances are I’ve got one lying around somewhere.



Anytime I try to write a script without a solid plan I end up with a “wandering script”. I don’t have the memory to just keep it in my head and I end up writing myself into holes. Doesn’t really affect my dialogue (not sure why it would), which I tend to think is what I’m best at. Dialogue is something I very rarely plan a head of time. I pretty much just write detailed treatments giving each scene a goal. I usually have no idea how I’m going to accomplish that goal until I get to the script stage though.


[/quote]

it sounds like you’ve written quite a bit, have you posted any of your stuff on the board I’m interested to see some of it.


#31

The best way to get prepared is to watch a lot of movies and make a lot of movies your self.


#32

[quote=“Ordell Rodriguez”]
it sounds like you’ve written quite a bit, have you posted any of your stuff on the board I’m interested to see some of it.
[/quote]

Yeah, I’ve posted a handful of things in the screenwriting forum over the years. It should all still be there. My sig also links to the Pilot episode of a series I wrote. It’s not my best though.


#33

I think I might post the script on one of those sites you guys showed me, when it’s done. I work on it every once in awhile, but I always write ideas and dialougue down just so I won’t forget them.


#34

I agree that Filmmaking and Screenwriting is a dream of mine, and I too have been fascinated with the process of making a movie the way QT does. There is no doubt in my mind that he relies heavily on the use of Storyboards to make it all come together. I have tried my hand at making storyboards for my own use, and I can honestly say it is not an easy thing to do. I did find a mentor near Los Angeles, his work is featured here: https://famousframes.com/ He told me not to mention his name because he doesn’t want others looking for “free” teaching but I think the site is worth checking out for inspiration.