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How Kill Bill will change Hollywood


#1

As someone posted the link to the Poopshoot article:

http://www.moviepoopshoot.com/elsewhere/index.html



Yeah that guy at Poop Shoot is cool!



I meat him at the Locarno Film Festival after the screening for this new awesome documentary “Peter Sellers: As He Filmed It”



<LINK_TEXT text=“http://2003.pardo.ch/2003/sito/programm … o?id=43990”>http://2003.pardo.ch/2003/sito/programma/film.do?id=43990</LINK_TEXT>





But while he says here: "On one level I feel badly about praising KILL BILL because it’s going to set back the cause of realism and true-grit in Hollywood action movies."



I am only feeling good for the future of Hollywood or whatever movie-projects to be undertakenin the future, if Kill Bill can humiliate whoever thinks it’s important to make realistic movies. And movie-makers thinking they are supposed to write and film stories that “can happen in your own life”. That’s stupid, I like Tarantino’s movie-movie idea much more than the Tarantino-universe realistic Bruce Willis stuff…





Is Matrix Reloaded a realistic movie? Maybe that’s why I think it’s crap, because the makers of Matrix Reloaded insisted too much writing a story that involves realistic character reactions… Maybe Keanu Reeves thinks too much while all the characters in Kill Bill are just acting themselves through actions without having to show stupid feelings.





I’m talking but I haven’t seen the movie yet.





I expect Kill Bill to also definately affect how Tarantino is gonna make his next movies. I hope Kill Bill is gonna be enough of a masterpiece to convince him to only do movie-movies in the future. Such a movie making being the only way to naturally make even better movies in the future. Cause writing and making such only-in-a-movie production is something that fits most naturally with the human creation process and the evolution of life.


#2

[quote] I expect Kill Bill to also definately affect how Tarantino is gonna make his next movies. I hope Kill Bill is gonna be enough of a masterpiece to convince him to only do movie-movies in the future. Such a movie making being the only way to naturally make even better movies in the future. Cause writing and making such only-in-a-movie production is something that fits most naturally with the human creation process and the evolution of life.[/quote]

Well, Inglorious Bastards isnt in the movie movie universe and I really wanna see that one. I dont think QT is ever going to do just one kind of style. Hes going to go back n forth between his movie movies and realer than real world films. Thats totally cool with me.


#3

I don’t think it’ll affect Hollywood that much. Afterall, the generic “Tarantino style” has already been adapted in many movies, and movies like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and the Matrix have inspired many martial arts movies so I don’t really think there’s anything to influence. If Tarantino had come out with this movie before Jackie Brown or even right after Jackie Brown, it might have been considered massively ground breaking stuff, but not now. It’ll certainly be better than the other martial arts movies in America, and it might even affect American directors who are making action movies to a certain extent, but I don’t think it’ll cause many waves.


#4

Isn’t Inglorious Bastards in the movie-movie universe? It could be, or he could make it too…



It might just be having characters without feelings, and Tarantino could be affected by the Kill Bill fenomenon and re-write the war epic to make it movie-movie if it isn’t allready…


#5

Kill Bill isn’t just a martial arts movie…



It’s now for the first time showing what shall be the right timing for awesome cinematic moments to succeed each other. It reminds the movie industry that successfull movie making is just about awesome cinematography and awesome timing and rythme in the action. (not about story, storytelling, realism, feelings nor morality)



But still one needs to see Kill Bill and see the reaction it will generate on the society before being so convinced or not about it’s revolutionnary concept…


#6

Its hardly revolutionary…evolutionary, maybe, but far from revolutionary.


#7

[quote]Its hardly revolutionary…evolutionary, maybe, but far from revolutionary.[/quote]

I Think QT defines the word Revolutionary. His films are definitely both Evolutionary and Revolutionary imo.



Revolutionary (adj) constituting or bringing about a major or fundamental change. (Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction anyone?)



Evolution: a process of change in a certain direction : UNFOLDING b : the action or an instance of forming and giving something off : EMISSION c (1) : a process of continuous change from a lower, simpler, or worse to a higher, more complex, or better state : GROWTH (2) : a process of gradual and relatively peaceful social, political, and economic advance d : something evolved

3 : the process of working out or developing



Those 2 words fit QT PERFECTLY. Kill Bill will be another evolution of revolutionary filmmaking.


#8

I definitely don’t think Bastards will be in the movie-movie universe. I think it will be more real, and I expect this movie to be more like Reservoir Dogs than any of his other movies. I’m not saying it will be a Dogs 2 or anything, I just think it will be in that kind of style. It won’t be anything like Kill Bill.


#9

Why is everyone always claiming there are no emotions in Kill Bill? There’s TONS of emotion in the script,that’s for sure. Especially in the last chapter, of course, but even in Volume One, there’s lots of feelings about…the coffeetable conversation with Vernita and Uma’s big crying scene are both emotionally significant moments. I don’t get people who don’t see the emotional subtexts in the script, and hopefully the movie as well.


#10

[quote]Why is everyone always claiming there are no emotions in Kill Bill? There’s TONS of emotion in the script,that’s for sure. Especially in the last chapter, of course, but even in Volume One, there’s lots of feelings about…the coffeetable conversation with Vernita and Uma’s big crying scene are both emotionally significant moments. I don’t get people who don’t see the emotional subtexts in the script, and hopefully the movie as well.[/quote]


Agreed. As a matter of fact, I 'm really looking forward to see how QT will balance together the dramatic and comedic aspects of the movie.


#11

[quote]


I Think QT defines the word Revolutionary. His films are definitely both Evolutionary and Revolutionary imo.



Revolutionary (adj) constituting or bringing about a major or fundamental change. (Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction anyone?)



Evolution: a process of change in a certain direction : UNFOLDING b : the action or an instance of forming and giving something off : EMISSION c (1) : a process of continuous change from a lower, simpler, or worse to a higher, more complex, or better state : GROWTH (2) : a process of gradual and relatively peaceful social, political, and economic advance d : something evolved

3 : the process of working out or developing



Those 2 words fit QT PERFECTLY. Kill Bill will be another evolution of revolutionary filmmaking. [/quote]

I definitely agree that QT’s style is revolutionary, but I don’t think the stories he tells are revolutionary…if that makes any sense. I can see how you can view it as being revolutionary as well as evolutionary, but I think its more subject to p.o.v. Let me ask you: When do you think QT’s unique style ceases to be revolutionary and becomes just part of the mainstream? If you said yes - feel that QT and every bit of his work will always be revolutionary because HE came up with greats like Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction, then I can’t argue with you, because you’re more than likely right…afterall, everything he touches by that definition will be revolutionary. But if you’re like me, and feel that the “revolution has already occurred” QT’s existing work has left such an impact upon the industry and been imitated so much that his name is literally an adjective now, then you might be right as well.



I think Kill Bill will be amazing, and will definitely make the Wachowski’s and their ilk look like chumps, and I’m sure it’ll definitely bring people to look at the genre in a new way, but I still view it as evolutionary at this point. In fact, I’ll go so far as to say that Reservoir Dogs was the only revolutionary movie QT’s ever made, since its the first film he ever did where he took genre conventions and turned it on its head. And unless QT has completely and utterly reinvented himself between Jackie Brown and Kill Bill, I think all of his other movies are, by my definition, evolutionary. The man himself is a revolutionary director, but only his first film can hold the title of being a revolutionary film since everything he’s done since has been an evolution of that first “genre twisting” model he developed.



I know my rant sounds wierd and incoherent, but I’m hoping that you guys at least get the gist of it.


#12

So… way back on: 02-10-2003 will Kill Bill change Hollywood?

House of flying daggers, Hero, Old Boy + plenty more asian films getting a lot more recognision, through Kill Bill (and Q being head of Cannes) anyone think of any more?


#13

Personally I’m glad whenever any film manages to impress mainstream audiences when it isn’t grounded completely in reality. People have become too obsessed with everything being ‘realistic’. Movies and even games are only viewed positively if they are realistic, when people fail to realise that part of our attraction with them stems from the fantasy they provide.



While I do agree that realistic films are just as good as more fantastical ones, unrealistic films are equally as important. You can access a lot of ideas and natural emotions through fantasy which would be harder to do through gritty realistic films of TV showa. A good example would be Buffy. The name suggests an easily dismissed concept, but the writers take the stories and characters to another level through supernatural metaphor, which couldn’t be achieved as successfully as, say, The OC.



The same goes with Tarantino. His films are generally very unlike anything most people would experience in their lives, but that’s not to say that the emotions or actions they experience are unrealistic. Rather, he is using a more fantastical approach to create exciting, stylish and, most of all, enjoyable films, grounded in a mixture of reality and fantasy. If all of his work was limited by realism then it would probably be much less engaging.



I also feel that the idea of realism is hard to define or measure. ‘Reality television’ for example, places people in extremely unlikely circumstances which hardly makes it realistic, not to mention how repetitive and cynical the whole concept is. Even documentaries aren’t always realistic, being biased by the message the director wants to communicate.



So generally I hope that any smart film that reminds people that an unrealistic approach can be just as valuable and entertaining as anything else does well and opens people’s eyes. Kill Bill pushes the boundaries a little, but not as much as something like Star Wars which has converted entire generations of disbelievers.