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How can somebody became... tarantino?


#1

ok now.Guys hello to everyone. i am from greece and i love tarantino. i really love movies. movies is my life and im seeing 1 movie every day. i want to know what tarrantino do to be today what it is. he has just write a scenario and then goes where? how he made his movie? what does someone have to do in order to someday direct a movie?

(also where i can find videos with tarantino interviews or videos with everything about tarantino?)


#2

Follow their dream and their passion and just keep trying and trying and trying. Tarantino got to achieve his dream I think because of lots of hard work and a bit of luck.


#3

Have you seen the movie Freaky Friday? Well, if you wish you could be in Tarantino’s shoes, and he wishes he could be you at the same time, then you will actually switch bodies. Many adventures will follow, many lessons learned.



Or…



Be talented. Sorry, but it’s a big factor in success as a film director. Study your craft. Practice your craft. It’s like kung-fu. Theory is okay, but you have to do it. And punching the air doesn’t help. If you want to get better, make films and show them. Take whatever feedback you get seriously. Learn and keep at it.


#4

I think BE DRIVEN is the most important one. Even if you have NO talent at all, you can achieve. Just be driven. My opinion is though, if yuo don’t have any talent, STAY THE FUCK OUT OF A DIRECTORS CHAIR!



Tarantino is an extremely obsessive, talented, driven, highly intelligent, gifted writer, charming person and a lot of other things, with a WHOLE LOT of luck and contacts who made it. I am very glad he did, because people like him are sadly rare these days :frowning: :’(


#5

I think what he meant (besides the fact that I didn’t see a sign outside that said “dead niggers grammar-free zone”, just kidding) is how technicall yoiu get to make movies. which is a question that’s been posted here a thousand times and i might want to refer you do our movie making section of this forum, and greetings to greece!


#6

He just spend money in the weekend on equipment and tried to make a movie during that weekend. All the material he got from that pretty much sucked, he liked bits and pieces from it…



That all failed, but he got lucky on Keitel reading and loving the Reservoir Dogs script…plus he sold his script for True Romance.


#7

Carl Barks someday says: a self-taught man has the worst teacher… i believe he is right but there has to be a way to start. (sorry for my english btw)



If i write a scenario who is going to read it from here? :smiley:. i wonder, when someone want to promote his work, he has the screenplay in a… screenplay form or in a story form? What he has to do if he thinks that he has a good scenario?


#8

You HAVE to learn from others. Read screenplays from the best screenplay writers and learn, steal and do whatever from them.

If you are talented and gifted enough, plus have a high IQ and a combination of being driven and having enough self-critique, you will design/ find your own style and if you pitch that…you WILL make it.


#9

Seth Gecko said, "That all failed, but he got lucky on Keitel reading and loving the Reservoir Dogs script…plus he sold his script for True Romance."



I understand what you’re saying. Luck is always a factor in anyone’s success. But let’s not forget that when Quentin wrote Reservoir Dogs, he was already a working writer. Much of it was uncredited, and he made peanuts, but he was already in circulation in the business. That is the result of ability more than luck, and Quentin honed his craft by toiling away at his required amount of crappy writing.



Exoskeletor, if you’re looking for someone to tell you how to be as good as Quentin Tarantino, I’m afraid you’re out of luck. QT is an extremely talented writer with an extensive knowledge of his medium. And he’s a genius.



You can start, like I said, with knowledge. Study. Sorry, you can’t get around it. I’m a professional writer/director working in L.A., and I can’t think of a single (working) writer or director who hasn’t dedicated a large percentage of his life to study. I’ve seen thousands of movies, read lots of fiction, and read a ton of screenplays. It’s a lifestyle career. It’s lonely, it’s risky, it’s thankless, and it’s necessary.



If you are going to make it as a writer and you’re asking “how do I get my work out there?” it’s a good indication you should stop talking about it, sit your ass down, and write. Otherwise you’d be sending your script to anybody who would read it. I honestly have enough connections (as do most people in L.A.) to get a good script in the right hands. That’s the easy part. Writing something worth reading is hard.



It should go without saying that, yes, if you want to write for the movies, you’ll be writing screenplays. That doesn’t mean you have to write in the format, but eventually you’ll have to deliver a screenplay. But again, formatting your script is the easy part.



Your last question is the only one that should matter to you, and it’s the hardest one to answer. How do you know if you’ve got a good idea? Unfortunately, there’s no litmus test for scenarios. What most writers do is go with their instincts. But you also need feedback. It really is the quickest way to build GOOD instincts. Most people start with friends and family. They’re usually easy to please. If you have finished material and want more accurate feedback, then find a pro you can trust. Don’t waste peoples’ time, though. Get your work to a finished enough state that you can accept criticism without having to make excuses. Focus on getting good, listen to feedback, don’t lie to yourself, and always, always practice.



P.S.: I’m not quite as optimistic as Seth_Gecko about people making it as professionals. I’ve seen too many people with heart and drive but no ability. Sometimes they go into other areas, like producing or managing. Bottom line: you won’t know any of this until you start WORKING at your craft. Nobody should have to tell you that. You should be doing already. You should be doing it right now.


#10

He was a working writer, BUT he originally planned reservoir dogs to be played out by his movie archives friends…hardly established if you ask me…



If the script hadnt been accidently fallen into keitels hands…I dunno how it all would’ve turned out for him…



Of course you need a bit of talent, but how come there are so many talentless hacks working nowadays? They must have other skills than talent for making art, in my eyes, comvincing and a big drive to do something…which seems to be more important than talent…


#11

[quote=“Seth_Gecko”]
He was a working writer, BUT he originally planned reservoir dogs to be played out by his movie archives friends…hardly established if you ask me…



If the script hadnt been accidently fallen into keitels hands…I dunno how it all would’ve turned out for him…
[/quote]
The script got into Keitel’s hands via Lawrence Bender, who had already produced a low-budget movie. The reason Quentin and Lawrence were talking in the first place was that Quentin was a working writer in Hollywood. The reason Quentin was a working writer is that he already had quality spec scripts under his arm. QT wrote lots of scripts for other people that most people will never know about. It’s just how it goes. But he was working, and there is a huge difference between a dipshit behind the Starbucks counter calling himself a writer and someone like QT, who people were willing to pay for his talents. I’m not saying luck is not a factor; it’s just not a very practical modus operandi, and in this case it’s not a necessary part of the equation. Quentin got there on plenty of merit.


#12

Bender was a producer on a low budget shitty movie…Qt was still working at a videostore…



I hardly call that established…



Well, I think, you CAN’T deny talent with a passion. If you have talent and a BIG drive, you WILL make it…just don’t be affraid to fail a 100 times…the 101th time you will succeed.


#13

i have run an iq test and it says 129 but i dont know if this really matters. i think that movies needs much more than that. for me,

they need fantasy, persons that need always to get better, that nothing is enough for them



Starick thank you very much for your post. I also believe that study is needed in everything. and if it wasnt needed, then the successs wouldnt be so nice.

Can You understand when someone has a talent? what if someone sends you something to read it? what do you prefer, a full screenplay? a simple story (god damn my english)



I really like the details in movies, this is for me what makes a perfect movie or just a good movie. When everything has a reason to be in a movie, even the simpliest ones, then the movie has something more, a personality. become something more than a song or a book. its the best entertainment and art for me that a human can get in this life


#14

Just IQ will get you nowhere. To be “highly gifted” or special, you also need a certain drive…



I have a high IQ and EQ, for example, but I am lazy as you have never seen before…I use my high EQ and IQ to do the least as possible and get the highest amount of profit for myself and people around me…



If I would find something that would be worthwhile investing energy in…I would be going like a rocket in it, but I really don’t have the artistic ability to do so…


#15

Seth_Gecko, the production on Bender’s first movie, Intruder, was a success. As far as I know, so was the movie. That is a big deal, and if you think it doesn’t have something big to do with getting Reservoir Dogs off the ground, sorry, but you’re wrong. And at the time of Reservoir Dogs, QT had written two scripts, one of which he’d sold. He had also done plenty of uncredited writing for other people. You may not call that established, but it’s a big deal in this town.



The point being: It’s not like Lawrence Bender and Quentin Tarantino, two lucky losers, bumped into Harvey Keitel and got a deal off it. If Lawrence hadn’t had a success as a producer, and if Quentin hadn’t had success as a writer, they would probably still be looking for money.



"…just don’t be affraid to fail a 100 times…the 101th time you will succeed."

That is a very upbeat saying, and obviously I agree one should keep trying. But guess what? EVERYBODY has passion. Talent? How can you show you have talent? By working, by turning out material. The only way to do that: ass in seat.



Exoskeletor, you’re welcome. Your English is pretty good, better than my use of any other language.



Can I spot talent? Well, I’d like to think so, but when I read new scripts, I just judge them as scripts. If the script is good, the writer must have talent. I don’t read as many scripts as, say, a big producer or script reader. I’m just a lowly writer/director person.



People submit screenplays. Some writers (established ones) can get people to read treatments. I don’t mind reading them, and it’s a good way to find story problems, but a treatment doesn’t really tell you much, since so much of the screenplay will depend on execution. And if you’re not a very established writer, don’t even bother showing treatments, except to friends.



I agree with you. I like simple, clean stories.


#16

Thanks again Stanrick. I want to ask you something. What is the correct form that a script must have? Must all of them be like this -> http://www.godamongdirectors.com/scripts/dusk.shtml or it can be something like a simple story? like a novel?


#17

Here’s a link I found:

<LINK_TEXT text=“http://www.scriptologist.com/Magazine/F … tting.html”>http://www.scriptologist.com/Magazine/Formatting/formatting.html</LINK_TEXT>



There are lots of programs that make formatting super easy. I use Final Draft. Another good program is Movie Magic.



Yes, a screenplay you submit to an agency should be formatted correctly. However, you don’t necessarily have to write your first draft in screenplay format. I don’t. I write in a “sort of” screenplay format, because I don’t like to get bogged down with the formatting while I’m supposed to be creative, and I don’t want to temp myself into editing while I’m writing. Like lots of writers, I write by hand on notebook paper. Later on, I type up my pages in Final Draft.


#18

I am Tarantino!


#19

[quote=“Exoskeletor”]
Thanks again Stanrick. I want to ask you something. What is the correct form that a script must have? Must all of them be like this -> http://www.godamongdirectors.com/scripts/dusk.shtml or it can be something like a simple story? like a novel?
[/quote]
they can be any fucking way you make them. do you think that QT gave a fuck about what anybody else thought?


#20

[quote]they can be any fucking way you make them. do you think that QT gave a fuck about what anybody else thought?[/quote]
Actually no they can’t. Screenplays have a very specific formula. Tarantino

would still be working in the video store if he had wrote True Romance in

novel form. There’s one more reason to not take writing tips from someone

who can’t find either shift key. Check out http://www.screenwriting.info