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Bret Easton Ellis


#1

Personally, I love to read but unfortunately I rarely have time to pick up any books these days. I still have Survivor by Palahniuk still sitting on my shelf where it has been for like a year. When I used to work at my old job, I used to bring books with me to work and during breaks I would catch a few pages here and there - and sometimes when we ran out of work, I could have like two hours of reading time before we had more lumber to stack (worked at a saw mill). These days though, just not enough hours in the day. So, a while back I picked up my second Bret Easton Ellis book, American Psycho and am just now getting around to reading through it and am enjoying it immensly. My first book from him, Less Than Zero, was a little more difficult to enjoy. Truthfully, Less Than Zero left me depressed for like a week after originally reading it :smiley: Looking back, I’ve grown to truly respect and admire it for that but at the time the lack of ANY character development and no full circle revelation into the hidden depths of these shallow characters just sent shockwaves through my system. It was a horrifying tale of debauchery that never presented any moral tale; and you just don’t go into stories expecting that.



American Psycho seems to be heading into a similar direction, but I find the comparison between this shallow man with deep and horrifying obsessions and his fellow coworkers who are just as shallow but don’t even had a hidden dark side to fall back on - quite interesting. Patrick Bateman is a character who is admittedly shallow and is devoid of all feelings, but unlike his fellow coworkers he can move between the crowds and put names with faces - actually recognize people and is able to make mental notes about his surroundings. He’s like a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Oh well, what does everyone else think? Any fans?


#2

I like a novel where there isn’t any character development or a “full circle revelation” as you like to call it. It is refreshing to see someone whose life is far more depressing than one’s own. As a matter of fact, it is quite original…unless you’re used to reading things like Mein Kamph or just about anything written by James Mischner…lots of words in his novels. Anyhow, I liked Less than Zero.


#3

[quote=“Kilgore Trout”]
I like a novel where there isn’t any character development or a “full circle revelation” as you like to call it. It is refreshing to see someone whose life is far more depressing than one’s own. As a matter of fact, it is quite original…unless you’re used to reading things like Mein Kamph or just about anything written by James Mischner…lots of words in his novels. Anyhow, I liked Less than Zero.
[/quote]Like I said, I did grow to enjoy it, but at the time coming out of my teenage years - the story kind of reminded me too much of some of my friends who were heading into similar directions. Really, I had one close friend who was getting into the whole “rave” culture and ruining his life one weekend at a time; so knowing there were characters out there like him and the thought of them doing such horrible things with no cares whether it’s right or wrong, just bugged the crap out of me at the time. These days though, I highly respect the book and have good memories about it.



Next I’m planning on picking up The Rules of Attraction, I hear there’s a section from Clay in the book :slight_smile:


#4

Here is the next book that every person should read:



Down and out in Paris and London by George Orwell



this novel changed the entire way in which I see the world. I actually used to buy into the whole “conservative Republican” thing before I read this. It is a real masterpeice.


#5

glamorama by easton ellis is amazing, too…


#6

[quote=“Kilgore Trout”]
I like a novel where there isn’t any character development or a “full circle revelation” as you like to call it. It is refreshing to see someone whose life is far more depressing than one’s own. As a matter of fact, it is quite original…unless you’re used to reading things like Mein Kamph or just about anything written by James Mischner…lots of words in his novels. Anyhow, I liked Less than Zero.
[/quote]

Depressing novels and depressing films make me happy. I was just talking to someone today about how I don’t like characters starting out as bad and miserable people and then changing to good people at the end. That is the single reason why I think Romper Stomper is ten times the film that American History X is. In American History X he sees the error of his ways and reforms. But in Romper Stomper, he starts out as a racist skinhead and in the end, he’s still a racist skinhead. To me that’s a little more true to life.